Annex 1: Responsible Spending

In 2007, the Government established a new standard for managing government spending focused on efficiency and effectiveness, core roles and delivering results for Canadians. Strategic reviews were introduced to support sound expenditure management and responsible spending. Between 2007–08 and 2010–11, over $2.8 billion in ongoing savings were generated from strategic reviews.

Building on the strategic reviews with a commitment to delivering ongoing priority programs and services in a financially responsible manner, the Government announced a review of departmental spending in Budget 2011.

Planned Reductions in Departmental Spending

Over the past year, the Government assessed hundreds of savings proposals put forward by government organizations. Guided by experts from outside government, organizations were asked to focus on achieving efficiencies in their operations, as well as to refocus business processes and service delivery platforms.

As part of the review, organizations examined their spending from the following perspectives:

  • Operating efficiency—To what extent are results being achieved efficiently? Can this activity be delivered at a lower cost or in a more effective way?
  • Internal services—Are internal services (e.g. human resources management, financial management, communications) as efficient as possible? Can improvements be made to reduce any overlap and duplication?
  • Effectiveness—To what extent is this program, activity or service achieving the expected results for which it was designed?
  • Affordability—Is the program, activity or service a priority, and is it affordable during a period of fiscal restraint?
  • Relevance and need—To what extent is there still a need for this program, activity or service?
  • Federal role—To what extent is this program, activity or service consistent with the federal government’s roles and responsibilities?
  • Organizational role—Would greater efficiencies be achieved if another department or agency, a government service provider, or the private sector delivered the program, activity or service?

The review encouraged departments to ensure that government programs and services remain relevant and effective, while achieving value for taxpayers’ money. These changes will:

  • Refocus government and programs by eliminating or reducing programs that can be delivered in other ways, for which demand is lower or which are no longer needed.
  • Make it easier for Canadians and businesses to deal with their government by providing effective and efficient programs and services to Canadians at a lower cost and by reducing unnecessary red tape to allow businesses to focus on creating jobs and contributing to Canada’s economic growth.
  • Modernize and reduce the back office by streamlining, consolidating and standardizing administrative functions and operations within and across organizations.

Total savings under the review ramp up to roughly $5.2 billion ongoing, representing 6.9 per cent of an aggregate review base of $75.3 billion. This represents less than 2.0 per cent of expected federal program spending in 2016–17.

Reflecting Canada’s strong economic growth and fiscal fundamentals, the scale of Canada’s efforts to reduce the deficit is modest compared to the expenditure restraint efforts being pursued by many other countries around the world or relative to the Program Review undertaken in Canada in the mid-1990s.

The Government will be introducing legislative and regulatory amendments required to implement the identified reductions in spending of departments, agencies and agents of Parliament. What follows is a description of the actions being taken by federal organizations to find efficiencies in their operations and re-engineer the way they do business.

Aboriginal Affairs and Northern Development Portfolio

Aboriginal Affairs and Northern Development Canada (AANDC) is achieving savings through restructuring, operational efficiencies and changes to business processes, in order to improve service delivery to Aboriginal communities.

The Department will work with Aboriginal peoples to make it easier for them to access program funding by simplifying the application process, agreements and reporting requirements. Steps will also be taken to provide qualified recipients with more flexibility and management control, while eliminating red tape for both recipients and the Department.

AANDC will continue to refocus the Department in keeping with developments such as a reduction in the backlog of specific claims and devolution of responsibilities to the Northwest Territories.

Table A1.1
Planned Savings—Aboriginal Affairs and Northern Development Portfolio
millions of dollars
  2012–13 2013–14 2014–15 Ongoing
Aboriginal Affairs and Northern Development portfolio 26.9 60.1 165.6 165.6
Aboriginal Affairs and Northern Development Canada 24.4 55.1 160.6 160.6
First Nations Statistical Institute 2.5 5.0 5.0 5.0
Note: Totals may not add due to rounding.

Agents of Parliament

Although not initially part of the review, Agents of Parliament adhered to the spirit and intent of the exercise and will pursue a series of measures, such as streamlining, consolidating and standardizing administrative functions, and improving business processes, to achieve operating savings. The Commissioner of Official Languages will contribute to the Government’s expenditure restraint efforts by reallocating operating savings towards necessary information technology investments.

Table A1.2
Planned Savings—Agents of Parliament
millions of dollars
  2012–13 2013–14 2014–15 Ongoing
Agents of Parliament 8.3 8.8 16.4 16.4
Auditor General of Canada 0.0 0.0 6.7 6.7
Chief Electoral Officer of Canada 7.5 7.5 7.5 7.5
Office of the Privacy Commissioner of Canada 0.7 0.7 1.1 1.1
Commissioner of Official Languages
Commissioner of Lobbying 0.0 0.2 0.2 0.2
Public Sector Integrity Commissioner of Canada 0.0 0.0 0.3 0.3
Office of the Information Commissioner of Canada 0.1 0.3 0.5 0.5
Note: Totals may not add due to rounding.

Agriculture and Agri-Food Portfolio

Agriculture and Agri-Food portfolio organizations will streamline their operations and reduce operating costs, while making sure services are provided to farmers and the agriculture industry in the most cost-effective and efficient way. For example, Agriculture and Agri-Food Canada and the Canadian Food Inspection Agency will merge their back-office functions and will integrate scientific research capacity and expertise through co-location and collaboration, making it easier for farmers and industry to get the information on technological advances they need to succeed. Agriculture and Agri-Food Canada will also consolidate the delivery of grants and contribution programs across the Department and streamline management of the Farm Debt Mediation Service.

Portfolio organizations are also taking steps to improve service delivery, making it easier for farmers, food processors and other clients to access programs and services. For example, the Canadian Food Inspection Agency (CFIA) will transform its service delivery approach by providing a single window for client applications for permits, licences and registration, as well as for the provision of technological, interpretive and specialized advice.

The Government will also change how the CFIA monitors and enforces non-health and safety food labelling regulations. The CFIA will introduce a web-based label verification tool that encourages consumers to bring validated concerns directly to companies and associations for resolution. The Government will also repeal regulations related to container standards to enable industry to take advantage of new packaging formats and technologies, while removing an unnecessary barrier for the importation of new products from international markets.

Table A1.3
Planned Savings—Agriculture and Agri-Food Portfolio
millions of dollars
  2012–13 2013–14 2014–15 Ongoing
Agriculture and Agri-Food Portfolio 17.1 168.5 309.7 309.7
Agriculture and Agri-Food Canada 14.9 158.4 252.9 252.8
Canada Agriculture Review Tribunal 0 0 0.1 0.1
Canadian Dairy Commission 0.0 0.0 0.4 0.4
Canadian Food Inspection Agency 2.1 10.0 56.1 56.1
Farm Products Council of Canada 0.1 0.1 0.3 0.3
Note: Totals may not add due to rounding.

Canada Revenue Agency

The Canada Revenue Agency continues to modernize its operations and reduce red tape to enhance services to Canadians while reducing its overall costs. It is increasingly providing services electronically to make it easier for Canadians and businesses to interact with the Agency at the lowest possible cost. By simplifying the way it collects taxes and distributes benefit payments, the Agency will ensure Canadians and small and medium-sized enterprises receive the benefits and credits to which they are entitled as efficiently and quickly as possible. In addition, the Agency will leverage the expertise of tax professionals to improve the effectiveness of its operations.

Table A1.4
Planned Savings—Canada Revenue Agency
millions of dollars
  2012–13 2013–14 2014–15 Ongoing
Canada Revenue Agency 14.8 87.0 225.4 253.1
Note: Savings associated with the Canada Revenue Agency’s spending reduction measures will continue to grow in value beyond 2014–15.

Citizenship and Immigration Portfolio

Citizenship and Immigration Canada and the Immigration and Refugee Board of Canada are making it easier for Canadians, immigrants and refugees to interact with them. They are also aligning their services with demand.

For example, Citizenship and Immigration Canada will change the way it operates in Canada and abroad by reducing overhead costs and continuing to streamline operations and program delivery to provide better value for Canadians. In this regard, it will continue to take steps to more efficiently process immigration applications by centralizing part of its visa processing, which will reduce duplication and overlap, and allowing in-Canada applicants to be processed in Canada.

These actions, together with the measures announced in Economic Action Plan 2012, will contribute to making the immigration system truly proactive, fast and flexible in a manner that will be responsive to labour market needs.

The Immigration and Refugee Board is making changes to ensure operational sustainability and maintain the quality and fairness of services to the public.

Table A1.5
Planned Savings—Citizenship and Immigration Portfolio
millions of dollars
  2012–13 2013–14 2014–15 Ongoing
Citizenship and Immigration Portfolio 29.8 65.2 84.3 84.3
Citizenship and Immigration Canada 26.5 59.0 71.2 71.2
Immigration and Refugee Board of Canada 3.3 6.3 13.1 13.1
Note: Totals may not add due to rounding.

Environment Portfolio

Environment Canada and the Parks Canada Agency will achieve efficiencies and savings through the consolidation and streamlining of administrative functions, program management, planning, and reporting requirements within each organization. As well, effective partnerships will be forged within the portfolio to eliminate redundancies, reduce costs and improve service to Canadians, including in the areas of environmental enforcement and monitoring. Both organizations are focusing on their core mandates, aligning their programs and services accordingly and partnering to deliver services.

For example, while the National Round Table on the Environment and the Economy (NRTEE) filled an important need in the past, a mature and expanded community of environmental stakeholders has demonstrated the capacity to provide analysis and policy advice to the Government. As a result, the Government will introduce legislation to eliminate the NRTEE.

Table A1.6
Planned Savings—Environment Portfolio
millions of dollars
  2012–13 2013–14 2014–15 Ongoing
Environment Portfolio 19.5 56.4 88.2 88.2
Environment Canada 13.3 31.5 53.8 53.8
National Round Table on the Environment and the Economy 0.2 5.2 5.2 5.2
Parks Canada 6.0 19.7 29.2 29.2
Note: Totals may not add due to rounding.

Finance Portfolio

The Department of Finance Canada will generate savings by reconfiguring and modernizing its internal services and policy analysis functions.

It is also taking a further significant step to reduce coinage procurement costs by changing the metal composition of $1 and $2 coins from metal alloys to plated steel cores and eliminating the penny. In contrast to other coin denominations, the Government loses money on every new penny produced. It costs the Government 1.6 cents to produce each new penny, which exceeds the penny’s face value by 0.6 cents. The estimated cost to the Government of supplying pennies to the economy is about $11 million per year.

Table A1.7
Planned Savings—Finance Portfolio
millions of dollars
  2012–13 2013–14 2014–15 Ongoing
Finance Portfolio 20.6 32.6 34.6 38.6
Department of Finance Canada 19.5 30.9 32.4 36.4
CITT 0.0 0.0 0.5 0.5
PPP Canada Inc. 0.3 0.5 0.5 0.5
FINTRAC 0.9 1.3 1.3 1.3
Note: Totals may not add due to rounding. Savings associated with the Department of Finance Canada’s spending reduction measures will continue to grow in value beyond 2014–15.

Fisheries and Oceans Canada

Fisheries and Oceans Canada will restructure its operations, consolidate internal services and leverage technology to realize efficiencies and achieve savings. It will also reduce its motor vehicle fleet, which will not only lower costs but also help green its operations.

The Department will consolidate its operations and make changes to its programming to provide more cost-effective services to Canadians. For example, it will refocus its research activities by leveraging, where it can, academia and other independent facilities. As committed in 2000, Fisheries and Oceans Canada will complete the transfer of responsibility for managing and maintaining Arctic ports to the Northwest Territories and Nunavut.

Table A1.8
Planned Savings—Fisheries and Oceans Canada
millions of dollars
  2012–13 2013–14 2014–15 Ongoing
Fisheries and Oceans Canada 3.8 13.4 79.3 79.3

Foreign Affairs and International Trade Portfolio

Organizations within the Foreign Affairs and International Trade portfolio will modernize and align their operations to best advance Canadian values and priorities while reducing the costs of maintaining their presence in Canada and abroad, without affecting services to Canadians. Steps will be taken to consolidate and streamline internal services in Canada and in missions abroad, reduce the vehicle fleet, review and update allowances, and extend the duration of postings. For example, the Foreign Service Directives for Canada-Based Staff serving around the world will be updated to better align them with current conditions and make them comparable to benefits provided in the private sector or by other public sector counterparts.

Foreign Affairs and International Trade Canada will also restructure its Canadian offices, foreign properties and missions to provide better value for money and results for Canadians. For instance, the Government will sell some official residences abroad and move to more practical and economical ones, generating capital revenue of $80 million.

Canada will also examine its participation in some international organizations to ensure that they are relevant to Canada’s interests and priorities.

The National Capital Commission, which reports to Parliament through the Minister of Foreign Affairs, plays an integral role in making Canada’s Capital Region a source of national pride and significance. Following a review of its services, the National Capital Commission will also streamline and modernize its operations by leveraging new technologies and equipment.

Table A1.9
Planned Savings—Foreign Affairs and International Trade Portfolio
millions of dollars
  2012–13 2013–14 2014–15 Ongoing
Foreign Affairs and International Trade Portfolio 72.4 116.6 169.8 169.8
Foreign Affairs and International Trade Canada 71.8 115.7 168.0 168.0
National Capital Commission 0.6 1.0 1.8 1.8
Note: Totals may not add due to rounding.

Health Portfolio

By enhancing coordination, consolidating operations and eliminating redundant activities, Health portfolio organizations will deliver improved services to Canadians. For example, Health Canada and the Public Health Agency of Canada will transform how they manage grants and contributions to achieve administrative efficiencies and generate savings, while maintaining service delivery to Canadians. Health Canada will also enhance its regional presence in the North, opening offices in Iqaluit and Yellowknife to deliver services locally rather than from Ottawa.

Health Canada and the Public Health Agency of Canada will adopt a shared services model, eliminating duplication and overlap between their respective organizations through the consolidation of internal services and the standardization of policies and processes.

Savings will also be achieved through organizational simplification. The Government will introduce legislation to wind down Assisted Human Reproduction Canada and will integrate it within Health Canada. A stand-alone agency for this reduced role is no longer justified. Health Canada will assume responsibility for compliance and enforcement related to federal responsibilities, and outreach activities.

The Canadian Institutes of Health Research, consistent with the two granting councils under the Industry portfolio, has ensured that programming in support of basic research, student scholarships, and industry-related research initiatives and collaborations are preserved. This approach sends a strong signal of the Government’s commitment to these priority areas. In addition, the Government will fully reinvest 2012–13 savings in priority areas of the granting councils, particularly in industry-academic partnerships.

Table A1.10
Planned Savings—Health Portfolio
millions of dollars
2012–13 2013–14 2014–15 Ongoing
Health Portfolio 111.7 218.5 309.9 309.9
Assisted Human Reproduction Canada 8.0 9.5 9.5 9.5
Canadian Institutes of Health Research 15.0 30.0 30.0 30.0
Hazardous Materials Information Review Commission 0.0 0.8 0.8 0.8
Health Canada 74.2 141.5 200.6 200.6
Patented Medicine Prices Review Board 0.8 0.9 1.0 1.0
Public Health Agency of Canada 13.7 35.7 68.0 68.0
Note: Totals may not add due to rounding.

Heritage Portfolio

Organizations within the Canadian Heritage portfolio will streamline corporate support functions, consolidate office space and improve the efficiency of operating processes, improve processes for managing programs and operations, and prioritize grants and contributions. Canadian Heritage will move to a more integrated policy framework that focuses on the socio-economic benefits that their programs offer to Canadians and their communities. The Department will also focus on funding that leverages contributions from partners.

For example, the Government is eliminating the Katimavik program, as it reaches a relatively small number of participants annually at a relatively high cost per participant due to the nature and duration of the experience. Canadian Heritage will continue to invest in youth programming and provide opportunities for more youth to learn about their country.

The Canada Council for the Arts, the National Gallery of Canada and national museums will not see any reductions in resources as a result of the review process.

Table A1.11
Planned Savings—Heritage Portfolio
millions of dollars
  2012–13 2013–14 2014–15 Ongoing
Heritage Portfolio 52.2 130.7 191.1 191.1
Canada Council for the Arts
Canada Science and Technology Museum
Canadian Broadcasting Corporation 27.8 69.6 115.0 115.0
Canadian Heritage 17.8 42.2 46.2 46.2
Canadian Museum of Civilization
Canadian Museum for Human Rights
Canadian Museum of Nature
Canadian Radio-television and Telecommunications Commission 0.0 0.4 0.4 0.4
Library and Archives of Canada 3.5 6.6 9.6 9.6
National Arts Centre Corporation 0.1 1.8 1.9 1.9
National Battlefields Commission 0.2 0.8 0.8 0.8
National Film Board of Canada 0.1 3.3 6.7 6.7
National Gallery of Canada
Telefilm Canada 2.7 6.0 10.6 10.6
Note: Totals may not add due to rounding.

Human Resources and Skills Development Portfolio

Organizations within the Human Resources and Skills Development portfolio will continue to modernize their operations to improve services to Canadians at a reduced cost. The Department will also streamline its organization, modernize its internal services, and consolidate and strengthen its policy and research capacity.

Human Resources and Skills Development Canada will transform the administration of grants and contributions to enhance online delivery and reduce red tape and the paper burden for applicants and recipients, thereby improving results for Canadians.

The Minister will introduce legislative amendments to eliminate administrative duplication in appeals and tribunal services by replacing the current administrative tribunal system for major federal social security programs with a single-window decision body. The new Social Security Tribunal will continue to provide a fair, credible and accessible appeals process for Canadians.

Table A1.12
Planned Savings—Human Resources and Skills Development Portfolio
millions of dollars
  2012–13 2013–14 2014–15 Ongoing
Human Resources and Skills Development Portfolio 10.6 64.7 286.7 286.7
Canada Mortgage and Housing Corporation 4.4 24.2 102.4 102.4
Human Resources and Skills Development Canada 6.3 39.4 183.2 183.2
National Council of Welfare 0.0 1.1 1.1 1.1
Note: Totals may not add due to rounding.

Industry Portfolio

Industry Canada has ensured that core activities related to government priorities, such as regulatory compliance and enforcement, grants and contributions that foster the knowledge-based economy, and support for key industries, are preserved. Industry Canada’s savings measures target reductions in administrative expenditures, office consolidations and more efficient research and analysis functions.

Statistics Canada will responsibly manage its resources and priorities while maintaining the collection and analysis of data relevant to public policy development, implementation and evaluation, and meeting the priority needs of Canadian institutions.

Organizations within the portfolio related to science and technology (the National Research Council of Canada and two of the three federal granting councils) have ensured that programming in support of basic research, student scholarships, and industry-related research initiatives and collaborations are preserved. This approach sends a strong signal of the Government’s commitment to these priority areas as identified by the Government and the research stakeholder community. In addition, Economic Action Plan 2012 is proposing $368.5 million over two years in new resources for priority initiatives delivered by these organizations.

Consistent with the objectives of the Federal Tourism Strategy, the Canadian Tourism Commission will adjust its activities to focus resources on markets of strategic importance to Canada’s tourism industry.

Table A1.13
Planned Savings—Industry Portfolio
millions of dollars
  2012–13 2013–14 2014–15 Ongoing
Industry Portfolio 89.2 182.7 217.3 217.3
Canadian Space Agency 7.9 24.7 29.5 29.5
Canadian Tourism Commission 0.5 14.2 14.2 14.2
Industry Canada 49.2 65.2 79.5 79.5
Natural Sciences and Engineering Research Council of Canada 15.0 30.0 30.0 30.0
National Research Council of Canada 1.3 16.3 16.3 16.3
Social Sciences and Humanities Research Council of Canada 7.0 14.0 14.0 14.0
Statistics Canada 8.3 18.3 33.9 33.9
Note: Totals may not add due to rounding.

International Development Assistance Portfolio

The Canadian International Development Agency, Foreign Affairs and International Trade Canada, the International Development Research Centre, the Royal Canadian Mounted Police and Natural Resources Canada will streamline administrative services and ensure more efficient program delivery. The Canadian International Development Agency will restructure and streamline management and internal services.

The Government of Canada will take steps to improve the effectiveness of Canada’s aid by strengthening its focus, improving efficiency and increasing accountability. In this regard, the Canadian International Development Agency will restructure its operations to reduce its operational costs and concentrate its efforts where it can have the greatest impact. The Agency and other portfolio organizations will adjust their programming in keeping with the ability of partners and regional institutions to implement programs, thus ensuring that Canada achieves sustainable results and improves the effectiveness of its aid.

Table A1.14
Planned Savings—International Assistance Envelope
millions of dollars
  2012–13 2013–14 2014–15 Ongoing
International Assistance Envelope (IAE) 180.7 242.1 377.6 377.6
Canadian International Development Agency 152.7 191.6 319.2 319.2
Foreign Affairs and International Trade Canada (IAE only) 15.5 28.8 29.1 29.1
International Development Research Centre 6.2 15.3 23.0 23.0
Royal Canadian Mounted Police (IAE only) 1.3 1.3 1.3 1.3
Natural Resources Canada (IAE only) 5.0 5.0 5.0 5.0
Note: Totals may not add due to rounding.

Justice Portfolio

The Department of Justice, the Public Prosecution Service of Canada and the Courts Administration Service are modernizing their operations to focus on core mandates and new ways of doing business while safeguarding Canada’s system of justice.

Following a review of its internal services, the Department of Justice will consolidate and streamline the delivery of administrative and legal services to eliminate duplication and reduce costs, and will improve service through the adoption of best practices and the creation of centres of expertise. This approach will enable it to provide more streamlined legal advice and maintain its standards of excellence.

The three organizations in this portfolio will increasingly leverage technology to modernize their operations and reduce costs. For example, the Department of Justice will rely to a greater extent on digital information holdings and electronic communications for meetings and publications to realize efficiencies and savings.

Table A1.15
Planned Savings—Justice Portfolio
millions of dollars
  2012–13 2013–14 2014–15 Ongoing
Justice Portfolio 21.2 69.0 76.9 76.9
Courts Administration Service 0.5 0.5 1.0 1.0
Department of Justice 12.3 60.2 67.5 67.5
Public Prosecution Service of Canada 8.4 8.4 8.4 8.4
Note: Totals may not add due to rounding.

National Defence Portfolio

Significant progress has been made in modernizing the Canadian Forces through major, necessary investments in the country’s military capabilities. To improve the efficiency and effectiveness of the organization, the Department of National Defence and the Canadian Forces will improve contracting processes, streamline the procurement of support equipment and spare parts, centralize real property management, and centralize and enhance human resources management to achieve better value for money.

As the Department of National Defence and the Canadian Forces transition to a lower pace of operations following the end of the combat mission in Afghanistan, Canadian Forces regular and reserve force strength will be maintained at 68,000 and 27,000, respectively. This will preserve balance across the four Canada First Defence Strategy pillars upon which military capabilities are built—personnel, equipment, readiness and infrastructure.

Table A1.16
Planned Savings—National Defence Portfolio
millions of dollars
  2012–13 2013–14 2014–15 Ongoing
National Defence Portfolio 326.8 706.1 1,119.8 1,119.8
Communications Security Establishment Canada 7.9 13.7 13.7 13.7
National Defence 318.8 692.4 1,106.1 1,106.1
Note: Totals may not add due to rounding.

Natural Resources Portfolio

Natural Resources Canada and the Canadian Nuclear Safety Commission will focus on their core roles and responsibilities, and will align their activities accordingly.

Natural Resources Canada will reduce internal corporate services and rationalize its organizational structure and operations to be more efficient. In focusing on its core mandate, Natural Resources Canada and the Canadian Nuclear Safety Commission will reduce or eliminate activities of low relevance, effectiveness, efficiency, or affordability. These changes will not have an impact on the health, safety and security of Canadians and the environment.

Table A1.17
Planned Savings—Natural Resources Portfolio
millions of dollars
  2012–13 2013–14 2014–15 Ongoing
Natural Resources Portfolio 68.3 86.0 108.3 108.3
Canadian Nuclear Safety Commission 0.5 1.3 1.3 1.3
Natural Resources Canada 67.8 84.7 107.0 107.0
Note: Totals may not add due to rounding.

Privy Council Office Portfolio

The Privy Council Office is transforming some of its operations and looking at innovative ways to achieve efficiencies. In addition, some support in non-critical areas will be removed to focus on core roles of advice to the Prime Minister and ministers, support to the Cabinet, and integration and leadership of the public service. For example, the Government is eliminating the Public Appointments Commission and Secretariat as it has significantly strengthened the rigour and accessibility of the public appointments system over the past five years, particularly for full-time and leadership positions.

Table A1.18
Planned Savings—Privy Council Office Portfolio
millions of dollars
  2012–13 2013–14 2014–15 Ongoing
Privy Council Office Portfolio 3.7 6.5 12.2 12.2
Privy Council Office 1.4 4.0 9.2 9.2
Canadian Intergovernmental Conference Secretariat 0.5 0.6 0.7 0.7
Public Appointments Commission Secretariat 1.1 1.1 1.1 1.1
Transportation Safety Board of Canada 0.7 0.8 1.3 1.3
Note: Totals may not add due to rounding.

Public Safety Portfolio

With the heaviest focus placed on maintaining service and preserving programs that are critical to protecting the safety of Canadians, Public Safety Canada will reduce spending in areas of declining necessity and derive savings from business transformation and organizational restructuring.

The Royal Canadian Mounted Police will be pursuing administrative and operational support efficiencies, with minimal impacts on direct policing operations.

The Canada Border Services Agency will streamline internal services and low-performing processes.

The Correctional Service of Canada will find efficiencies in its operations and will continue to use existing facilities. The Government has not built a single new prison since 2006 and has no intention of building any new prisons.

Table A1.19
Planned Savings—Public Safety Portfolio
millions of dollars
  2012–13 2013–14 2014–15 Ongoing
Public Safety Portfolio 179.4 370.7 687.9 687.9
Canada Border Services Agency 31.3 72.8 143.4 143.4
Canadian Security Intelligence Service 13.7 20.2 24.5 24.5
Correctional Service of Canada 85.5 170.2 295.4 295.4
Parole Board of Canada 1.6 2.7 4.8 4.8
Public Safety Canada 2.9 15.8 24.7 24.7
Royal Canadian Mounted Police 44.4 89.1 195.2 195.2
Note: Totals may not add due to rounding.

Public Service Commission of Canada

By streamlining internal operations and making greater use of technology, the Public Service Commission of Canada will restructure and reduce its internal services, aligning with the Commission’s program changes and rationalization.

These actions are being undertaken without compromising the Commission’s role of providing assurance of the integrity of the staffing system in the federal public service.

Table A1.20
Planned Savings—Public Service Commission of Canada
millions of dollars
  2012–13 2013–14 2014–15 Ongoing
Public Service Commission of Canada 2.2 4.5 9.0 9.0

Public Works and Government Services Canada

Public Works and Government Services Canada is transforming how it does business to better serve its clients through increased efficiency and effectiveness. In this regard, the Department will modernize its information technology infrastructure to reduce annual licensing, maintenance and operating costs. In addition, the Department will transition to electronic publications and will increasingly adopt online service delivery to Canadians and businesses.

The Department will also rationalize redundant services and consolidate its operations while meeting the needs of other federal government organizations and ultimately Canadians. It will also introduce new office space standards in Crown-owned and federal government occupied buildings. The new, more efficient and effective office accommodation standards are consistent with industry best practices.

Table A1.21
Planned Savings—Public Works and Government Services Canada
millions of dollars
  2012–13 2013–14 2014–15 Ongoing
Public Works and Government Services Canada 1.5 28.1 85.3 177.6
Note: Given that a large portion of its spending is fixed over the short term (e.g. through lease agreements and contracts), Public Works and Government Services Canada has until 2018–19 to achieve its savings target.

Regional Development Agencies

Following a review of their internal services, the regional development agencies will consolidate offices, internal services, procurement and environmental assessment services to eliminate duplication and reduce operating costs, while continuing to deliver quality services to entrepreneurs and communities. Aligning with private sector and community demand, they will focus on supporting projects with the greatest economic growth and job creation potential in communities across Canada.

Table A1.22
Planned Savings—Regional Development Agencies
millions of dollars
  2012–13 2013–14 2014–15 Ongoing
Regional Development Agencies 26.7 73.4 86.9 86.9
Atlantic Canada Opportunities Agency 2.1 13.8 17.9 17.9
Canada Economic Development for Quebec Regions 7.4 26.7 28.1 28.1
Canadian Northern Economic Development Agency 0.2 2.4 2.4 2.4
Federal Economic Development Agency for Southern Ontario 10.4 21.3 22.1 22.1
Western Economic Diversification Canada 6.6 9.3 16.3 16.3
Note: Totals may not add due to rounding.

Shared Services Canada

Created in August 2011, Shared Services Canada has a mandate to streamline and reduce duplication in the Government’s information technology (IT) services while strengthening the security of government and Canadian data. Shared Services Canada is standardizing and re-engineering IT services across government to provide more cost-effective and efficient government operations.

Through Shared Services Canada, the Government will move to a single e-mail system, consolidate its data centres from over 300 to less than 20 and streamline its electronic networks. Shared Services Canada will now deliver e-mail, data centre and network services to 43 organizations. Shared Services Canada will also support the Government’s Workplace 2.0 efforts, enabling a more mobile, connected, collaborative and efficient work force. This will improve services to Canadians, make IT more secure and reliable, and save taxpayers’ dollars.

Table A1.23
Planned Savings—Shared Services Canada
millions of dollars
  2012–13 2013–14 2014–15 Ongoing
Shared Services Canada 74.7 104.5 150.0 150.0

Transport Portfolio

Organizations in the Transport portfolio identified a combination of productivity-enhancing and transformative measures that change the way programs and services are delivered and support the Government’s agenda of refocusing government and reducing red tape. Non-core activities will be reduced while maintaining capacity related to core mandates in order to protect the safety of Canadians and support economic growth.

For example, VIA Rail Canada Inc. will pursue productivity improvements such as augmenting the performance of the heating, ventilation and air conditioning systems on board trains to reduce maintenance costs, reduce energy consumption, and increase passenger comfort. It will also implement automation projects such as electronic ticketing and invoicing systems.

Table A1.24
Planned Savings—Transport Portfolio
millions of dollars
  2012–13 2013–14 2014–15 Ongoing
Transport Portfolio 63.4 97.2 152.6 152.6
Canadian Air Transport Security Authority 19.4 32.4 59.7 59.7
Marine Atlantic Inc. 0.5 2.2 10.9 10.9
The Jacques Cartier and Champlain
Bridges Incorporated
0.0 0.5 0.5 0.5
Transport Canada 37.0 47.0 61.8 61.8
VIA Rail Canada Inc. 6.5 15.1 19.6 19.6
Notes: The Government is committed to balance air travel security expenses with Air Travellers Security Charge revenues over time. Totals may not add due to rounding.

Treasury Board Portfolio

The Treasury Board Secretariat and the Canada School of Public Service will align their organizational structures and resources with their core mandates by scaling back where appropriate. For example, the Secretariat is moving to electronic reporting and making better use of technology to provide guidance on management policies. The Canada School of the Public Service is eliminating the Advanced Leadership Program. With these changes, the Secretariat and the School are sharpening their focus on supporting management excellence and accountability across government.

Table A1.25 Planned Savings—Treasury Board Portfolio
millions of dollars
  2012–13 2013–14 2014–15 Ongoing
Treasury Board Portfolio 10.4 18.6 30.2 30.2
Canada School of Public Service 2.8 3.5 6.6 6.6
Treasury Board Secretariat 7.6 15.1 23.6 23.6
Note: Totals may not add due to rounding.

Veterans Affairs Canada

Veterans Affairs Canada will continue to make it easier for Veterans and their families to receive the benefits and services they are entitled to in the shortest possible time. For instance, replacing the existing contribution agreements for the housekeeping and grounds maintenance components of the Veterans Independence Program with annual grants will simplify the process for more than 96,000 Veterans, primary caregivers and survivors.

Changes will also be made to eliminate duplication and overlap between Veterans Affairs and the Department of National Defence to better serve Canadian Forces Members and Veterans.

Table A1.26
Planned Savings—Veterans Affairs Portfolio
millions of dollars
  2012–13 2013–14 2014–15 Ongoing
Veterans Affairs Portfolio 36.1 49.3 66.7 36.9
Veterans Affairs Canada 36.1 49.3 66.7 36.9
Veterans Review and Appeal Board
Note: The lower ongoing savings for Veterans Affairs Canada reflects the accrual impact of some of its savings measures, which are fully amortized by 2015–16.