Language selection

Search

Annex 3
GBA+ Summary for the Fall Economic Statement

Gender-based Analysis Plus (GBA+) provides federal officials with the means to attain better results for Canadians by being more responsive to specific needs and ensuring that government policies and programs are inclusive. The Canadian Gender Budgeting Act was passed by Parliament in December 2018, enshrining the government’s

commitment to decision-making that takes into consideration the impacts of policies on all types of Canadians. The Act legislated the government’s commitment to publish information on the GBA+ impacts of all new budget measures. The government acknowledges that this analysis is often limited by the availability of data, especially for certain identity factors such as race, sexual orientation and disability.
This Annex summarizes the GBA+ impacts of measures included in the Fall Economic Statement. Please see the end of the table for definitions of the data points.

Note on Terminology

In this section, the term "visible minorities" is occasionally used because it is the official demographic category defined by the Employment Equity Act and used by Statistics Canada in their surveys. With the commitment to support a task force on modernizing the Employment Equity Act, the question of appropriate terminology will be taken up by this task force.

Measure GBA+
Timing
Target
Population
Expected Direct Benefits Included in or Announced:
Gender Income Distribution Inter- generational Additional
Characteristics
Early, Later
or Existing
Men – Women Strongly benefits
Low – High
Benefits
Youth –Senior
   
Chapter 1 - Fighting COVID-19
Procuring Personal Protective Equipment Early in the idea development phase (when proposals are being developed) All Canadians, Health Care Workers No significant intergenerational impacts or impacts generation between youth and seniors Seniors, People with Underlying Health Conditions New in this Fall Economic Statement
  • $1.5 billion over nine years, starting in 2020-21, to support the procurement of additional PPE and to ensure adequate storage and warehousing of personal protective equipment. 
  • $500 million in 2020-21, to procure supplies for the broader health system and essential service providers.
This funding supports all Canadians, including health care workers through improved access to personal protective equipment (PPE) – for example, N95 masks, gowns, gloves – which will reduce their risk of becoming infected with COVID-19, or transmitting the virus to patients. Front-line health care workers are mostly women and one in four are immigrants. In 2018, over 90 per cent of regulated nurses were women, over 90 per cent of personal support workers in long-term care homes and community homecare were women and among health care and social assistance employees 81 per cent were women. According to the 2016 Census, visible minorities are overrepresented as workers in nursing and residential care facilities.
Canadian industry and workers have also benefitted as companies have pivoted operations to support the domestic production of PPE and supplies.
Safe Restart Agreement, Federal Investments in Testing, Contact Tracing and Data Management Mid-point (when proposals are being finalized), and/or later stage (after proposals are finalized, prior to proposal submission). All Canadians Broadly gender-balanced Somewhat benefits low income individuals (Somewhat progressive) Primarily benefits seniors or the baby boom generation Lower-income Workers Policy Action Announced since the July 2020 Snapshot
  • An additional $1.282 billion in 2020-21 under the Safe Restart Agreement with provinces and territories to support direct federal investments in testing, contact tracing and data management in order to mitigate the spread of COVID-19.
These investments are expected to benefit all Canadians. More prevalent testing contact tracing, and data increase detection and prevention of COVID-19, helping to reduce its transmission among Canadians. Low-income Canadians will likely benefit from this support as many work in sectors that have a relatively high risk of exposure to COVID-19. Reduced wait times for testing could also help low-income workers better mitigate work disruptions. Other Canadians who are particularly vulnerable to COVID-19, including front-line health care workers, seniors and those with co-morbidities, could also see disproportionate benefits from these investments. Federal investments in data management will, in part, facilitate the collection of COVID-19 infection data on the basis of race and occupation, which will help to identify the impacts of COVID-19 on different Canadian sub‑populations and to inform future policy decisions to address health inequities, some of which could potentially lead to improved health outcomes among racialized Canadians.
Safe Return to Class Fund Mid-point (when proposals are being finalized), and/or later stage (after proposals are finalized, prior to proposal submission). Students,  Education Sector Workers 60 percent - 79 percent women No significant distributional impacts Primarily benefits youth, children and/or future generations Teachers, Support Staff, Parents Policy Action Announced since the July 2020 Snapshot
  • Up to $2 billion in 2020-21 to establish a Safe Return to Class Fund for provinces and territories to support a safe return to class and to protect students and staff.
The Fund will support the adaptation of the education sector, benefiting students and staff, by supporting a safe return to the classroom. Students will have the opportunity to learn, socialize, and develop in a safe environment, while parents, especially mothers, will be supported to remain in or return to the workforce.
Direct Support to Yukon, Northwest Territories and Nunavut in further Support of Territorial COVID-19 Pandemic Response Mid-point (when proposals are being finalized), and/or later stage (after proposals are finalized, prior to proposal submission). Residents of the Territories Broadly gender-balanced Somewhat benefits low income individuals (Somewhat progressive) No significant intergenerational impacts or impacts generation between youth and seniors Remote Populations, Indigenous Peoples New in this Fall Economic Statement
  • $64.7 million in 2020-21 to support COVID-19 response measures in the Northwest Territories, Yukon and Nunavut.
This measure will benefit residents in the territories, including Indigenous peoples, as they make up a significant portion of the population in the North. Communities within the territories can be more vulnerable to the spread of COVID-19 due to certain health, social and economic characteristics, including smaller health care facilities, overcrowded housing and lower health outcomes.
Support for Essential Air Access to Remote Communities Mid-point (when proposals are being finalized), and/or later stage (after proposals are finalized, prior to proposal submission).  Residents of Remote or Northern Communities Broadly gender-balanced Somewhat benefits low income individuals (Somewhat progressive) No significant intergenerational impacts or impacts generation between youth and seniors Residents of Remote or Northern Communities including Indigenous Peoples Policy Action Announced since the July 2020 Snapshot
  • $174.3 million over three years, starting in 2020-21, to Transport Canada to ensure a minimum level of essential air service to Canada’s remote communities during the COVID-19 pandemic and subsequent recovery period.
This measure will directly benefit residents of remote communities by ensuring the continuation of essential air services, enabling the supply of food, medical supplies and other essential goods and services. A higher portion of these communities are Indigenous and have lower income and education levels compared to the population as a whole.
Small air carriers, who receive payments for their services, will also benefit from this measure. While the air services workforce is typically dominated by men, there is insufficient data to determine whether this is the case for small airlines serving remote communities. The program is not anticipated to have negative differential impacts for particular groups of the population.
Safe Restart Framework for Indigenous Communities Mid-point (when proposals are being finalized), and/or later stage (after proposals are finalized, prior to proposal submission). Indigenous Peoples 60 percent - 79 percent women Somewhat benefits low income individuals (Somewhat progressive) Primarily benefits youth, children and/or future generations Indigenous Children and Youth Policy Action Announced since the July 2020 Snapshot
  • $318.1 million in 2020-21 to support a safe restart in Indigenous communities, including adapting community infrastructure, supporting a safe return to school in First Nations communities and other supports for safe restart in Indigenous post-secondary education institutions and Indigenous early learning and child care.
These investments will support First Nations communities on reserve to adapt existing infrastructure where people work and learn, increase personnel and adjust education programs and services. This is expected to benefit all First Nations community members, specifically children, youth, students and workers. The investment will also support the continued vitality of Indigenous post-secondary education institutions, which are important to supporting Indigenous students’ success. This is expected to benefit more Indigenous women than men as a significant majority of Indigenous post-secondary students are women. Lastly, the investment will support the safe reopening of Indigenous early learning and child care spaces by enabling First Nations, Inuit and Métis Nation partners to direct funding. This is expected to disproportionately benefit low-income populations, particularly children and women, who are primary caregivers and for whom these services will enable a safe return to work.
Indigenous Community Support Fund Mid-point (when proposals are being finalized), and/or later stage (after proposals are finalized, prior to proposal submission). Indigenous Peoples Broadly gender-balanced Somewhat benefits low income individuals (Somewhat progressive) No significant intergenerational impacts or impacts generation between youth and seniors  Indigenous Peoples New in this Fall Economic Statement
  • $685 million in 2020-21, including $305 million announced in August 2020, for the Indigenous Community Support Fund to address immediate needs related to COVID-19 in First Nations, Inuit and Métis communities, and to support organizations serving those who live in urban centres or off reserve, in the context of COVID-19, bringing total investments for the Indigenous Community Support Fund to over $1 billion.
As with initial investments in the Indigenous Community Support Fund, these additional funds are expected to benefit Indigenous peoples across Canada. Many Indigenous communities are faced with unique challenges related to remoteness, lack of infrastructure and capacity, crowded housing and increased underlying health conditions, which put individuals in those communities at greater risk of contracting COVID-19. For individuals living off reserve, in urban centres, or separated from their communities, it can be difficult to access the help they need.
Through distinctions- and needs-based funding, the Indigenous Community Support Fund provides Indigenous leadership and organizations with flexibility to design and implement community-based solutions to prepare for and react to the spread of COVID-19. Funding can be used to support a range of services including supporting elders and vulnerable community members, addressing food insecurity, providing educational or other support for children, or fund mental health assistance and emergency response services.
Offsetting Declines in Indigenous Own-source Revenues Mid-point (when proposals are being finalized), and/or later stage (after proposals are finalized, prior to proposal submission). Indigenous Peoples Broadly gender-balanced Somewhat benefits low income individuals (Somewhat progressive) No significant intergenerational impacts or impacts generation between youth and seniors Indigenous Communities with Own-source Revenue New in this Fall Economic Statement
  • $332.8 million in 2021-22 to support First Nations, Inuit and Métis communities to off-set declines in own-source revenues that are used to deliver important community services.
This measure will support Indigenous communities that supplement their community programming with own-source revenue by providing additional funding to support essential programs and services to their members. Indigenous people face greater socio-economic barriers (higher unemployment, lower average income and education levels, poorer health and living conditions) and, as such, are more vulnerable to service cuts than non-Indigenous Canadians. This funding will help ensure that Indigenous communities that relied on community resources to support service delivery can continue to provide the same level of core community services to their members.
Further Support for Medical Research and Vaccine Developments Later stage (after proposals are finalized, prior to submission of proposal) All Canadians Broadly gender-balanced No significant distributional impacts Primarily benefits seniors or the baby boom generation People with Underlying Health Conditions Policy Action Announced since the July 2020 Snapshot
  • $13.6 billion to support Canadian medical countermeasures including bolstering domestic bio-manufacturing capacity, securing access to vaccines and therapeutics, preparing for the widespread deployment of successful vaccines and investments in critical research and technologies to protect Canadians.
These measures support access to and deployment of vaccines and therapeutics, bio-manufacturing capacity and research on COVID-19, which will benefit all Canadians. Successful vaccine and therapy candidates could provide broad benefits to Canadians, including those directly affected by the virus. While women are more likely to be diagnosed with COVID-19, men have been slightly more likely to be admitted to the intensive care unit after hospitalization and more men have died from COVID-19 worldwide. Seniors and those with compromised immune systems are at greater risk of serious illness. These measures will also indirectly benefit workers in the health sciences, pharmaceutical and research sectors.
Bio-manufacturing Capacity Expansion – National Research Council Royalmount Facility Mid-point (when proposals are being finalized), and/or later stage (after proposals are finalized, prior to proposal submission). All Canadians Broadly gender-balanced No significant distributional impacts No significant intergenerational impacts or impacts generation between youth and seniors Seniors, People with Underlying Health Conditions Policy Action Announced since the July 2020 Snapshot
  • $120.7 million over two years, starting in 2020-21, and $20 million per year ongoing thereafter (cash basis), to the National Research Council to support an expansion of its Human Health and Therapeutics bio-manufacturing facility on Royalmount Avenue in Montreal.
This measure is expected to benefit all Canadians. However, in Canada, a strong association has been observed between high COVID-19 rates and low-income groups, conditions of work, racialized Canadians, seniors and people with lower levels of educational attainment. While women are more likely to be diagnosed with COVID-19, men have been slightly more likely to be admitted to the intensive care unit after hospitalization and more men have died from COVID-19 worldwide. The expansion of the facility is expected to help increase Canada’s vaccine production capacity and mitigate risks related to domestic access and supply. The benefits of a vaccine could particularly benefit groups, such as seniors and those with compromised immune systems who are at greater risk of serious illness.
The indirect beneficiaries will be those working at or with the facility. Employment at the facility will be monitored to support the recruitment and retention of women and racialized Canadians, particularly those with science, technology, engineering and mathematics (STEM) backgrounds where they tend to be underrepresented. For instance, in 2016, 23 per cent of science and technology workers among Canadians aged 25 to 64 were women. The Council has a number of initiatives to help build a more inclusive and diverse workforce, such as a mentorship program for women in STEM fields and frequent employment surveys and human resource data monitoring to help develop evidence-based intervention and improve workplace culture.
Supporting and Sustaining the Public Health Agency of Canada and Health Canada's Pandemic Operations Mid-point (when proposals are being finalized), and/or later stage (after proposals are finalized, prior to proposal submission). All Canadians 60 percent - 79 percent women No significant distributional impacts No significant intergenerational impacts or impacts generation between youth and seniors Seniors, People with Underlying Health Conditions New in this Fall Economic Statement
  • $803 million over two years, starting in 2020-21, to support ongoing pandemic response efforts and prepare for subsequent waves of COVID-19.
While affecting all Canadians, the COVID-19 pandemic has disproportionately affected a number of vulnerable populations. In Canada, 81 per cent of health and social assistance employees are women. Women also predominantly hold caretaking and household responsibilities, putting them at increased risk while caring for ill family members. Among confirmed cases, men, individuals with underlying conditions such as heart disease, chronic respiratory disease, diabetes, or cancer or those who are immunocompromised and older Canadians are dying from COVID-19 at a higher rate.
Innovative Research and Support for New Testing Approaches and Technologies for COVID-19 Mid-point (when proposals are being finalized), and/or later stage (after proposals are finalized, prior to proposal submission). All Canadians Broadly gender-balanced Somewhat benefits low income individuals (Somewhat progressive) Primarily benefits seniors or the baby boom generation Lower-income Workers, Rural and Remote Communities New in this Fall Economic Statement
  • $565.4 million over three years, starting in 2020-21, to procure COVID-19 testing supplies, support innovative approaches to testing and support research to assess how the virus is circulating in Canada and the impact of various interventions.
Federal procurement of point-of-care and rapid testing devices is expected to benefit all Canadians by supporting provinces and territories in their testing efforts, especially in areas where laboratory capacity may be limited, including in northern, remote and Indigenous communities. Supporting innovative approaches to testing is also expected to benefit all Canadians through more prevalent testing. These measures may be particularly beneficial to low-income Canadians, given their increased likelihood to be employed in occupations with a relatively high risk of exposure to COVID-19, such as minimum wage and service sector jobs. Reduced wait times for test results could help to minimize work disruptions for low-income workers, who are less likely to be able to work remotely. The innovative research initiatives will help to assess where and how the virus is circulating in Canada and evaluate the impact of various interventions.
Overall, more prevalent testing and surveillance for COVID-19 will increase detection of the virus and help to reduce its transmission, thereby improving health outcomes among the general population. Canadians that are particularly vulnerable to COVID-19, such as front-line health care workers, seniors and those with co-morbidities, also stand to benefit.
Canadian Digital Service Later stage (after proposals are finalized, prior to submission of proposal) All Canadians Broadly gender-balanced Somewhat benefits low income individuals (Somewhat progressive) No significant intergenerational impacts or impacts generation between youth and seniors Persons with Disabilities, Indigenous Peoples New in this Fall Economic Statement
  • $20.5 million over two years, starting in 2020-21, to meet emerging demands for digital services stemming from COVID-19 and other government priorities.
This measure will increase the capacity of the Canadian Digital Service, within the Treasury Board Secretariat, to design and deliver digital services in inclusive and accessible ways to all Canadians, including Indigenous peoples, low-income Canadians and people with disabilities. More inclusive digital services will allow Canadians to receive services and programs they are eligible for, with less time and effort spent navigating government processes.
GST/HST Relief on Face Masks and Face Shields Mid-point (when proposals are being finalized), and/or later stage (after proposals are finalized, prior to proposal submission). All Canadians Broadly gender-balanced No significant distributional impacts No significant intergenerational impacts or impacts generation between youth and seniors Seniors, People with Underlying Health Conditions, Health Care Workers New in this Fall Economic Statement
  • Expected tax relief of $95 million over two years, starting in 2020-21, would result from removing the Goods and Services Tax/Harmonized Sales Tax (GST/HST) on sales of face masks and face shields.
This measure supports all Canadians, including health care workers, low-income Canadians, and those susceptible to a higher rate of dying from COVID-19. Front-line health care workers are mostly women and one in four are immigrants. Low-income Canadians have an increased likelihood to be employed in occupations with a relatively high risk of exposure to COVID-19. In addition, those most susceptible to dying from COVID-19 among confirmed cases include men, individuals with underlying conditions such as heart disease, chronic respiratory disease, diabetes, or cancer or those who are immunocompromised, and older Canadians.
Extending COVID-19 Support for Homelessness Mid-point (when proposals are being finalized), and/or later stage (after proposals are finalized, prior to proposal submission). Canadians Experiencing Homelessness 60 percent - 79 percent men Strongly benefits low income individuals (Strongly progressive) No significant intergenerational impacts or impacts generation between youth and seniors Indigenous Peoples, Urban Populations New in this Fall Economic Statement
  • $236.7 million in 2020-21 (announced in September 2020) and $299.4 million in 2021-22 in emergency funding to Reaching Home Community Entities in order to maintain services to prevent and reduce homelessness and reduce the spread of COVID-19.
Homelessness is a significant issue across Canada that affects a diverse cross-section of the population. Additionally, people experiencing homelessness face significant risks of contracting COVID-19 for a variety of reasons including inability to follow social distancing guidelines, overcrowded shelters and increased likelihood of pre-existing medical conditions. As a result, there is a significant need for communities to take active measures to limit the risk of contracting COVID-19 among people experiencing homelessness, and the staff and volunteers who work with this population. The expansion of funding for federal homelessness programming will enable these communities to develop and implement responses that address local challenges related to the crisis, including for specific populations.  Although men make up the majority of the homeless population, populations such as youth, women, trans individuals, people fleeing violence, families, Indigenous peoples, LGBTQ2 people and newcomers all make up segments of the homeless population.
Quarantine Facilities and COVID-19 Border Measures Later stage (after proposals are finalized, prior to submission of proposal) All Canadians Broadly gender-balanced Somewhat benefits low income individuals (Somewhat progressive) No significant intergenerational impacts or impacts generation between youth and seniors Lower-income Workers, Racialized Canadians Policy Action Announced since the July 2020 Snapshot
  • $764.8 million over two years, starting in 2020-21, on a cash basis, to strengthen border and travel health measures, including maintaining quarantine facilities for international travellers, as well as to support voluntary isolation sites in municipalities across Canada.
This measure will benefit all Canadians by facilitating the safe and effective quarantining and self-isolation of individuals and reducing the spread of COVID-19 in Canada. Quarantine facilities and isolation sites will be particularly beneficial to individuals and the families of individuals who are unable to safely quarantine or self-isolate at their home, including due to crowded living arrangements. These may include lower income or racialized individuals and their families, who are more likely to live in multigenerational households.
Extension of the Mandatory Isolation Support for Temporary
Foreign Workers Program
Mid-point (when proposals are being finalized), and/or later stage (after proposals are finalized, prior to proposal submission). All Canadians; Canadian Food Producers Predominantly men (e.g. 80 percent or more men) Somewhat benefits low income individuals (Somewhat progressive) No significant intergenerational impacts or impacts generation between youth and seniors Newcomers, Agriculture, Agri-food Companies Policy Action Announced since the July 2020 Snapshot
  • $34.4 million over four years, starting in 2020-21 to extend the existing Mandatory Isolation Support initiative for Temporary Foreign Workers Program through to the end of the 2020-21. 
The MISTFWP will directly benefit agricultural producers, fish harvesters and food processors who employ temporary foreign workers and are facing costs to ensure their workers adhere to the mandatory 14-day isolation period. Temporary Foreign Workers (TFWs) who come to Canada stand to indirectly benefit from the MISTFWP as it will help to ensure their employers support their mandatory isolation, covering their wages and any necessary accommodations.
Producers, food processors and fish harvesters are generally men and older, with varied levels of income. In 2019, 69 per cent of employees in primary agriculture and 60 per cent of employees in food processing were men. In 2016, producers earned a median household income of $82,456. Only 9 per cent of these producers were under the age of 35. In 2018, 46 per cent of food processing employees were 45 or older with average hourly earnings of $33.00 for salaried employees and $21.84 per hour for hourly paid employees, which is lower than the overall manufacturing sector’s average hourly earnings of $37.04 and $25.33 per hour for salaried and hourly paid employees, respectively. In 2016, 79 per cent of fish harvesters were men and were mostly 45 to 64 years of age with a median household income of approximately $64,000. The median household income of the total population at the same time was $70,275.
In 2019, 18 per cent of TFWs were women across all skill levels. Of these women, 64 per cent were lower skilled workers, which typically are hired into the agricultural sector. While predominantly men, TFW labourers are generally lower income, have less education and are non-Canadians who are seeking economic opportunities or could also be seeking pathways to permanent residency. TFWs are considered to be a particularly vulnerable subgroup of agricultural labourers due to language barriers and a lack of understanding of their rights and services offered to them upon arrival in Canada.
Canadian Armed Forces Support for the COVID-19 Response Mid-point (when proposals are being finalized), and/or later stage (after proposals are finalized, prior to proposal submission). All Canadians Broadly gender-balanced No significant distributional impacts No significant intergenerational impacts or impacts generation between youth and seniors Seniors, Rural and Remote Communities Policy Action Announced since the July 2020 Snapshot
  • $418 million in 2020-21 to support the Government of Canada’s response to the COVID-19 pandemic, including assistance provided to provincial and territorial governments.
This measure is likely to benefit all Canadians, but especially those most affected by the pandemic. This includes seniors who are particularly susceptible to the virus, residents of long-term care facilities that received support from military personnel, residents of provinces more affected by the pandemic and rural and remote areas which have greater direct engagement with the Canadian Armed Forces. A significant share of the cost of this measure relates to the temporary full-time employment of reservists. The indirect benefits of the associated employment opportunities will mostly accrue to men, who represent around 84 per cent of the total number of reservists.
Addressing Labour Shortages in Long-Term and Home Care Mid-point (when proposals are being finalized), and/or later stage (after proposals are finalized, prior to proposal submission). Seniors, Persons with Disabilities, Care Workers   Predominantly women (e.g. 80 percent or more women) Somewhat benefits low income individuals (Somewhat progressive) Primarily benefits seniors or the baby boom generation Persons with Disabilities, Immigrant Workers Policy Action Announced since the July 2020 Snapshot
  • $38.5 million over two years, starting in 2020-21, for Employment and Social Development Canada to address acute labour shortages in long-term and home care.
The COVID-19 crisis created an urgent need for solutions to supplement the current workforce in long-term care and home care. This measure will support training up to 4,000 personal support worker interns through an accelerated online program combined with 4-month work placements to help address acute labour shortages. The measure aims to reduce the current workload of personal support workers and improve the level of care for seniors and persons with disabilities in long-term care facilities or receiving home care. Recipients of care will mostly be seniors (two thirds of residents of long-term care homes are women), plus some younger people with disabilities.  Given that in 2019 women held 81.3 per cent (or 2 million) of jobs in the health care and social assistance industry and immigrants held 26.6 per cent of these jobs, this measure will primarily benefit women and immigrants. Further, according to the 2016 Census, visible minorities were overrepresented as workers in nursing and residential care facilities.  
Further Investments in Long-Term Care Mid-point (when proposals are being finalized), and/or later stage (after proposals are finalized, prior to proposal submission). Residents in Supportive Care Facilities 60 percent - 79 percent women Somewhat benefits low income individuals (Somewhat progressive) Primarily benefits seniors or the baby boom generation Residents, Workers in Supportive Care Facilities New in this Fall Economic Statement
  • $1.01 billion over three years starting in 2020-21, primarily to provide funding to provinces and territories in the coming months for the prevention of COVID-19 infection spread, outbreaks and deaths in supportive care facilities (long-term care and assisted living), benefiting both residents and workers in those facilities.
In the first wave of the pandemic, 82 per cent of all COVID-19 deaths in Canada were in long-term care and seniors residences. A recent increase in the number of new outbreaks in these settings suggests the need for additional measures. Residents in supportive care facilities who will benefit will mostly be seniors, plus some younger individuals with serious disabilities. Women represent over two-thirds of the population of long-term care homes. The supportive care workforce will also benefit through improved infection prevention and control as well as other improvements to their work environment in supportive care facilities. The 2016 Census indicates that both personal support workers and licensed practical nurses are predominantly comprised of women and that more than 30 per cent of them are immigrants; average incomes for personal support workers were $32,305 in 2015, while average incomes of licensed practical nurses were $44,265.
Supporting Distress Centres and the Wellness Together Canada Portal and Supporting Canadians struggling with Substance Use Disorder Mid-point (when proposals are being finalized), and/or later stage (after proposals are finalized, prior to proposal submission). All Canadians Broadly gender-balanced No significant distributional impacts No significant intergenerational impacts or impacts generation between youth and seniors People Experiencing Mental Health Issues, People with Problematic Substance Use New in this Fall Economic Statement
  • $93 million for mental health to bolster distress centres and extend the Wellness Together Canada portal and $66 million to support Canadians struggling with problematic substance use.  
All Canadians, including vulnerable populations, like Canadians struggling with substance use, stand to benefit from this measure. Public health restrictions, like physical distancing, health concerns and anxiety, and economic uncertainty resulting from the COVID-19 pandemic are affecting the mental health and well-being of many Canadians. Approximately half of Canadians report that their mental health has worsened since physical distancing to protect against COVID-19 began, reporting an increase in stress, anxiety, depression and loneliness. These impacts are particularly significant for youth and LGBTQ2 individuals, as well as recent immigrants and racialized populations. Additional mental health support has been provided to children and youth, including those living in rural communities, through the Kids Help Phone. During the COVID-19 pandemic, there have been significant increases in opioid-related deaths and harms.  For example, in March to September, British Columbia paramedics reported nearly 7,500 overdose calls in summer, the highest ever in a three-month stretch. In Ontario, over the first 15 weeks of the pandemic, there were 695 opioid-related deaths, a 38 per cent increase over the previous 15 weeks. Between April and June there were 302 opioid-related deaths in Alberta, up from 2018’s previously recorded three‑month high of 211 deaths.
Further Support for the Canadian Red Cross' Response to COVID-19 Mid-point (when proposals are being finalized), and/or later stage (after proposals are finalized, prior to proposal submission). All Canadians Broadly gender-balanced No significant distributional impacts Primarily benefits seniors or the baby boom generation Low-income Residents and Indigenous Peoples New in this Fall Economic Statement
  • An additional $35 million for a total of up to $135 million in 2020-21 to help the Canadian Red Cross meet increased demand due to COVID-19 and to support future flood and wildfire efforts.
While this investment is expected to benefit all Canadians, early data show that COVID-19 poses an increased health risk to some populations, including seniors and those who have a compromised immune system or an underlying medical condition. The Canadian Red Cross will continue to offer a range of services to help these populations, including support for quarantine and isolation sites, delivery of food and care to individuals who are self-isolating as well as deployment of health specialists and health supplies and equipment, including a mobile field hospital. Seniors are particularly vulnerable to the impacts of COVID-19 as they are likely to experience challenges getting essentials and connecting with others while isolating, and directly benefit from increased support from the Canadian Red Cross. A 2007 report from the Canadian Red Cross identified 10 populations in Canada that are at the highest risk of experiencing some degree of loss, such as injury, death and damages, following a hazardous event. These populations include seniors, low-income residents and Indigenous peoples.
Civilian Humanitarian Workforce Mid-point (when proposals are being finalized), and/or later stage (after proposals are finalized, prior to proposal submission). All Canadians 60 percent - 79 percent women No significant distributional impacts Primarily benefits seniors or the baby boom generation People with Underlying Health Conditions, Racialized Canadians New in this Fall Economic Statement
  • $150 million over two years, starting in 2021-22, to support the Canadian Red Cross and other non-governmental organizations in enhancing and maintaining a humanitarian workforce to provide surge capacity in response to COVID-19 and other large-scale emergencies.  
While a humanitarian workforce benefits all Canadians, some Canadians are more at risk of COVID-19 infection and mortality due to their social, health, economic and occupational circumstances, including seniors, people with underlying health conditions, racialized Canadians and women. These groups may have a higher need for surge support and the humanitarian workforce will be able to tailor their approach to each community’s particular needs. The humanitarian workforce will have diverse personnel and strive to be representative of the population it serves.
Improving Ventilation in Public Buildings Mid-point (when proposals are being finalized), and/or later stage (after proposals are finalized, prior to proposal submission). All Canadians Broadly gender-balanced No significant distributional impacts No significant intergenerational impacts or impacts generation between youth and seniors Healthcare Workers, Seniors, People with Underlying Health Conditions New in this Fall Economic Statement
  • $150 million over three years, starting in 2020-21, to improve ventilation in public buildings to help reduce the spread of COVID-19.
This measure will benefit Canadians that are more likely to work in or visit public buildings. As the measure is intended to help reduce the spread of COVID-19, it will particularly benefit Canadians who are vulnerable to COVID-19, such as front-line healthcare workers, seniors and those with medical conditions. This measure will also indirectly benefit the construction industry, whose workforce is predominantly men.
Further Enhancing Public Health Measures in Indigenous Communities Mid-point (when proposals are being finalized), and/or later stage (after proposals are finalized, prior to proposal submission).  Indigenous Peoples Broadly gender-balanced Somewhat benefits low income individuals (Somewhat progressive) Primarily benefits seniors or the baby boom generation Indigenous Peoples, People with Underlying Health Conditions, Rural and Remote Communities New in this Fall Economic Statement
  • $631.6 million over two years, starting in 2020-21, to support the ongoing public health response to COVID-19 in Indigenous communities.
While COVID-19 affects everyone, a number of factors increase the likelihood and severity of outbreaks in certain communities, like Indigenous communities. These include crowded housing, lack of infrastructure, unsafe drinking water, complex health conditions like tuberculosis and inequities in health care services.
This investment will support Indigenous communities, with particular benefits for seniors and individuals with existing medical conditions who are at higher risk for developing severe and possibly fatal complications from COVID-19. The measure helps prevent and contain the spread of COVID-19 in Indigenous communities, with a particular focus on communities that are remote and isolated and that have limited direct access to provincial and territorial health systems.
Indigenous Mental Wellness Support Mid-point (when proposals are being finalized), and/or later stage (after proposals are finalized, prior to proposal submission). Indigenous Peoples Broadly gender-balanced Somewhat benefits low income individuals (Somewhat progressive) Primarily benefits youth, children and/or future generations Indigenous Youth Policy Action Announced since the July 2020 Snapshot
  • $82.5 million in 2020-21 to provide surge capacity to address mental wellness needs in Indigenous communities related to COVID-19 pressures.
First Nations, Inuit and Métis experience significantly poorer mental health compared to other populations in Canada. This measure supports the adaptation of mental wellness services to operate more safely during the COVID-19 pandemic, and strengthens the workforce to ensure adequate human resources are available to respond to mental wellness needs in Indigenous communities. Although all age groups may benefit, research suggests that intergenerational trauma continues to affect youth, as youth and young adults have higher rates of suicide.
Supportive Care in Indigenous Communities Mid-point (when proposals are being finalized), and/or later stage (after proposals are finalized, prior to proposal submission). Indigenous Seniors and Persons with Disabilities 60 percent - 79 percent women Somewhat benefits low income individuals (Somewhat progressive) Primarily benefits seniors or the baby boom generation Indigenous Peoples Rural and Remote Populations New in this Fall Economic Statement
  • $186.8 million over two years, starting in 2020-21, to address needs and gaps in supportive care facilities in the context of COVID-19 and provide additional home care in Indigenous communities.
This investment will support Indigenous people who live in supportive care facilities or receive home care in Indigenous communities, including seniors, people with disabilities and their caregivers. According to the First Nations Regional Health Survey, among First Nations adults, 46.5 per cent of women report having two or more chronic health conditions compared to 36.4 per cent of men, which may indicate that Indigenous women are at higher risk of needing long-term medical and personal care. According to the 2016 Census, women also make up the vast majority of care and personal support workers and 92.7 per cent of Indigenous Registered Nurses are women.
Additional Support for the International Response to COVID-19 Mid-point (when proposals are being finalized), and/or later stage (after proposals are finalized, prior to proposal submission). All Canadians Broadly gender-balanced No significant distributional impacts No significant intergenerational impacts or impacts generation between youth and seniors People in Other Countries Policy Action Announced since the July 2020 Snapshot
  • Provide $400 million in additional resources since the Economic and Fiscal Snapshot 2020 to support the recovery and resilience of developing countries and address short-term humanitarian and development needs caused by the pandemic and other crises.
This measure will provide targeted assistance to address the immediate humanitarian and development needs caused by the pandemic in vulnerable countries. Targeted groups include women and girls, people with disabilities, migrants, refugees, internally displaced persons, Indigenous peoples, seniors and low-income persons. Canadians will also benefit indirectly through reduced risks from the disease, both at home and abroad.
This measure will be delivered under Canada’s Feminist International Assistance Policy and will support the achievement of the United Nations’ 2030 Agenda for Sustainable Development.
Measure GBA+
Timing
Target
Population
Expected Direct Benefits Included in or Announced:
Gender Income Distribution Inter- generational Additional
Characteristics
Early, Later
or Existing
Men – Women Strongly benefits
Low – High
Benefits
Youth –Senior
   
Chapter 2: Supporting Canadians through the Pandemic
Canada Emergency Wage Subsidy  Mid-point (when proposals are being finalized), and/or later stage (after proposals are finalized, prior to proposal submission). Workers and Employers Affected by COVID-19 Broadly gender-balanced Somewhat benefits high income individuals (Somewhat regressive) No significant intergenerational impacts or impacts generation between youth and seniors Employees of Eligible Employers, Business Owners and Other Employers Policy Action Announced since the July 2020 Snapshot
  • $83.54 billion until the end of Period 13 (on March 13, 2021) in 2020-21 to provide a wage subsidy to eligible employers.
As of October 25, 2020 (data from periods 1 to 7), small-sized employers (25 or fewer employees) represented the largest share of approved applications, while medium-sized employers (26-250 employees) accounted for the largest number of employees supported. By industry, current applicant data show that the largest number of employers receiving support to date were in accommodation and food services, followed closely by professional, scientific and technical services. The largest numbers of employees covered were in manufacturing, followed by accommodation and food services. Although no data are available on the gender composition of the employees receiving the wage subsidy, based on the analysis of the current applicant data, men may be slightly more likely to be covered by the subsidy than women. This is, however, only suggestive and a more detailed analysis will be required once 2020 income tax data are available. Additionally, Indigenous government-owned businesses are expected to benefit from the subsidy.
In addition to benefitting workers, shareholders or owners of eligible businesses may also benefit from the measure, since the subsidy could help reduce expenses at a time of reduced business activity. Individuals benefitting from non-profit organizations and charities may also benefit from this measure.
Enhancements to Employment Insurance Mid-point (when proposals are being finalized), and/or later stage (after proposals are finalized, prior to proposal submission). EI Eligible Workers 60 percent - 79 percent women Somewhat benefits low income individuals (Somewhat progressive) No significant intergenerational impacts or impacts generation between youth and seniors Youth, Lower-income Workers Policy Action Announced since the July 2020 Snapshot
  • Up to $10.2 billion over three years, starting in 2020-21, to introduce temporary changes to the Employment Insurance (EI) program to make it more simple, flexible and generous.
Changes to the EI system are expected to benefit all Canadians, but particularly low-wage workers and youth as both groups were hardest hit by job losses and employment has been slow to recover for low-wage employees and youth. Specifically, the measure will support these workers by helping them qualify for EI. The benefit floor of $500/week will also result in a higher effective replacement rate than under normal EI rules. These measures are also expected to benefit women who are overrepresented in lower-paying jobs, more vulnerable to work stoppages, more likely to work in part‑time or temporary jobs and more likely to receive parental benefits.
Canada Recovery Sickness Benefit Mid-point (when proposals are being finalized), and/or later stage (after proposals are finalized, prior to proposal submission). Canadians with Greater Exposure and Health Risks to COVID-19 60 percent - 79 percent women Somewhat benefits low income individuals (Somewhat progressive) Primarily benefits seniors or the baby boom generation People with Underlying Health Conditions Policy Action Announced since the July 2020 Snapshot
  • Up to $4.96 billion over two years, starting in 2020-21, to provide income support to workers who are unable to work for at least 50 per cent of the week because they are sick or must self-isolate for reasons related to COVID-19.
The measure is expected to benefit those affected by the pandemic, particularly women as well as racialized and lower-income people living in cities across Canada. Women, especially racialized women, tend to be overrepresented in low‑paying jobs, with less access to employer-provided paid sick leave. In addition, this benefit will support those with underlying health conditions who are more susceptible to the virus. The flexibility of the eligibility rules will also facilitate access to self-employed individuals, including vulnerable workers such as women, persons with disabilities and recent immigrants.
Canada Recovery Benefit Mid-point (when proposals are being finalized), and/or later stage (after proposals are finalized, prior to proposal submission). Workers 60 percent - 79 percent women Somewhat benefits low income individuals (Somewhat progressive) No significant intergenerational impacts or impacts generation between youth and seniors Workers Policy Action Announced since the July 2020 Snapshot
  • Up to $9.7 billion over two years, starting in 2020-21, to provide income support to non-EI-eligible workers who have ceased working or workers experiencing a reduction in income of at least 50 per cent.
The Canada Recovery Benefit primarily targets workers who are not eligible for EI benefits and who are unable to return to work. The hours-based eligibility structure of EI means that unemployed men are more likely to be EI eligible than unemployed women, as a higher proportion of women work in part-time or temporary jobs. As a result, women may benefit more from the Canada Recovery Benefit. As the benefit does not vary in amount and is not proportional to normal weekly earnings prior to the pandemic, lower-income individuals are likely to benefit more as a greater proportion of their income is replaced by the benefit. The flexibility of the eligibility rules will also facilitate access to self-employed individuals, which tend to be lower-income workers in precarious employment such as those working in the gig economy.
Canada Recovery Caregiving Benefit Mid-point (when proposals are being finalized), and/or later stage (after proposals are finalized, prior to proposal submission). All Canadians 60 percent - 79 percent women Somewhat benefits low income individuals (Somewhat progressive) No significant intergenerational impacts or impacts generation between youth and seniors Caregivers Policy Action Announced since the July 2020 Snapshot
  • Up to $9.4 billion over two years, starting in 2020-21, to provide income support to workers unable to work for at least 50 per cent of the week because they must care for a child under the age of 12 or family member who requires supervised care for reasons related to COVID-19.  
The Canada Recovery Caregiving Benefit is likely to benefit workers and parents, particularly women and their children, dependants or family members. Women tend to shoulder the majority of caregiving responsibilities in Canada and make up the vast majority of EI parental, family caregiving and compassionate care benefit claimants. The flexibility of the eligibility rules will also facilitate access to self-employed individuals, including vulnerable workers such as women, persons with disabilities and recent immigrants.
Canada Emergency Rent Subsidy and Lockdown Support Mid-point (when proposals are being finalized), and/or later stage (after proposals are finalized, prior to proposal submission). Businesses and Other Organizations Affected by COVID-19 60 percent - 79 percent men Somewhat benefits high income individuals (Somewhat regressive) No significant intergenerational impacts or impacts generation between youth and seniors Tenants, Business Owners, Charities and Non-profits Policy Action Announced since the July 2020 Snapshot
  • $4.36 billion in 2020-21 for the Canada Emergency Rent Subsidy and the Lockdown Support to provide rent- and mortgage-related support to businesses and other organizations until March 13, 2021.
The Canada Emergency Rent Subsidy is designed to benefit eligible employers, which include businesses, non-profit organizations and registered charities. This measure is intended to directly benefit business owners by subsidizing eligible rent- or mortgage-related costs. Shareholders or owners of eligible businesses are thus expected to directly benefit from the measure. Aggregate data on the overall shareholder population from 2017 indicate that men received 60 per cent of the value of dividends and that while taxpayers in the top income tax bracket make up only 1 per cent of all filers, they receive about 39 per cent of the value of dividends. Men and high-income individuals are expected to benefit somewhat more.
Employees of eligible businesses may also benefit indirectly from this measure, as well as individuals benefitting from non-profit organizations and charities. This measure shares some eligibility criteria with the Canada Emergency Wage Subsidy, and based on data for the latter, it is expected that employers in accommodation, food services, professional, scientific and technical services will be among those that benefit from the subsidy. In these industries, men are not significantly more numerous (as of 2019 they represent about 44 per cent of employees in accommodation and food services and 58 per cent of employees in professional, scientific and technical services).
Additionally, Indigenous government-owned businesses are expected to benefit from the subsidy.
Canada Emergency Business Account Mid-point (when proposals are being finalized), and/or later stage (after proposals are finalized, prior to proposal submission). Canadian Businesses  60 percent - 79 percent men No significant distributional impacts No significant intergenerational impacts or impacts generation between youth and seniors Small Businesses and Not-for-profits, Including Charities and Religious Organizations Policy Action Announced since the July 2020 Snapshot
  • The Canada Emergency Business Account provides support to small businesses across all regions and sectors of the economy, including not-for-profit organizations. This measure provides up to $40,000 in interest-free loans to businesses to support their non-deferrable costs during the COVID-19 pandemic. Repaying the balance of the loan by December 31, 2022, will result in loan forgiveness of 25 per cent (up to $10,000). The program was launched on April 9, 2020 and will accept applications until March 31, 2021.
The Canada Emergency Business Account is designed to help businesses facing liquidity shortages due to the COVID-19 pandemic. Older men and those living in urban settings represent the largest population of those who will likely benefit from the program, given that they represent the largest demographic group of small and medium-sized business owners. The eligibility criteria for the CEBA program are industry neutral and therefore program take-up should reflect the current demographics of small business owners. The program is available at more than 200 financial institutions across Canada, which helps mitigate disparities among any particular group. In September/October 2020, 54 per cent of businesses had applied for and received the CEBA. Businesses majority-owned by Indigenous persons (56 per cent), immigrants (61 per cent), members of the LGBTQ2 communities (57 per cent) and visible minorities (61 per cent) were more likely to report applying for and receiving CEBA, while businesses majority-owned by women (50 per cent) and persons with a disability (49 per cent) were less likely to report applying for and receiving the CEBA. This result may reflect differences in the average size of these firms.
Highly Affected Sectors Credit Availability Program Mid-point (when proposals are being finalized), and/or later stage (after proposals are finalized, prior to proposal submission). Canadian Businesses 60 percent - 79 percent men No significant distributional impacts No significant intergenerational impacts or impacts generation between youth and seniors Vulnerable Small and Medium‑sized Businesses New in this Fall Economic Statement
  • Introduce the Highly Affected Sectors Credit Availability Program to help bridge vulnerable businesses to the other side of the pandemic. The government will work with financial institutions in the near term to create a new program for the hardest hit businesses, including those in sectors like tourism and hospitality, hotels, arts and entertainment.  
New support through the Highly Affected Sectors Credit Availability Program will have a positive impact across the business sector and workforce, with some degree of focus toward businesses and industries most vulnerable to current economic volatility, such as tourism and hospitality-based industries. As such, this measure will benefit men more, as only 16 per cent of Canadian small and medium‑sized enterprises (SMEs) are majority women owned and 21 per cent are owned equally by men and women. Roughly one quarter of SMEs that are majority owned by Indigenous people and visible minorities are also majority owned by women, compared with 16 percent of all SMEs. Certain hard‑hit sectors, such as tourism, are more broadly gender-balanced, with 30 per cent of businesses in the tourism sector being women-owned, and may be impacted differently from other sectors. Employment in the tourism sector has also been broadly gender-balanced, with women occupying 51 per cent of jobs, and the accommodations industry employing a greater share of women at 60 per cent.
Regional Relief and Recovery Fund Mid-point (when proposals are being finalized), and/or later stage (after proposals are finalized, prior to proposal submission). Small and Medium-sized Businesses 60 percent - 79 percent men Somewhat benefits high income individuals (Somewhat regressive) No significant intergenerational impacts or impacts generation between youth and seniors Indigenous-owned Businesses, Rural Businesses New in this Fall Economic Statement
  • $600 million in 2020-21 for the Regional Relief and Recovery Fund to better ensure small and medium-sized businesses unable to access other COVID-19 support measures can access financial assistance. This fund is delivered through Regional Development Agencies and the Community Futures Network of Canada.
  • $500 million over two years for the Regional Relief and Recovery Fund to continue supporting small businesses unable to access other federal COVID-19 assistance measures, including newly announced Canada Emergency Business Account loan limit increases.
  • $3 million in 2020-21 for the Canadian Northern Economic Development Agency to advance foundational economic development projects.
Use of the Regional Relief and Recovery Fund has been relatively high among rural, women-owned and Indigenous-owned businesses that have been unable to access financing elsewhere. An estimated 16 per cent of small and medium-sized enterprises (SMEs) in Canada are majority owned by women. Of the businesses that have sought support under the Regional Relief and Recovery Fund, 29.8 per cent have been women-owned or operated. Majority Indigenous-owned businesses make up 1.4 per cent of Canada’s SMEs and 4.1 per cent of the SMEs seeking support through the Regional Relief and Recovery Fund. Similarly, 19.3 per cent of Canada’s SMEs are rural based, while 44.5 per cent of the SMEs seeking support under the Regional Relief and Recovery Fund were from rural areas. 
Supporting Workers in the Live Events and Arts Sectors Later stage (after proposals are finalized, prior to submission of proposal) The Live Events and Arts Sectors Broadly gender-balanced Strongly benefits low income individuals (Strongly progressive) No significant intergenerational impacts or impacts generation between youth and seniors Artists and Live Events Workers New in this Fall Economic Statement
  • $181.5 million in 2021-22 to support the planning and presentation of COVID-19-safe events and arts presentations – including both live and digital – and to provide work opportunities in these sectors.
Supporting the live events and arts sectors is expected to benefit a broad diversity of artists and freelance cultural workers, such as performing artists and live event workers, including those from Indigenous, deaf and disability and official language minority communities. This new funding will aim to support arts and culture workers and projects across the country. The arts and live events sector is roughly gender-balanced and has a high proportion of low-income earners. The median individual income of Canadian artists is $24,300, or 44 per cent less than all Canadian workers.
Supporting Canada's Broadcasting System Mid-point (when proposals are being finalized), and/or later stage (after proposals are finalized, prior to proposal submission). All Canadians, Broadcasters 60 percent - 79 percent men No significant distributional impacts No significant intergenerational impacts or impacts generation between youth and seniors Local Private Broadcasters (e.g., Television and Radio) New in this Fall Economic Statement
  • Up to $50 million in 2020-21 to provide additional COVID-19 relief to broadcasters by supporting the waiving of Part II licence fees in 2020-21 for Canadian television and radio stations.
Waiving Part II license fees will provide general financial relief to the broadcasting industry and help to maintain the broadcasting of news and entertainment that will benefit all Canadians, as well as employees of broadcasters, particularly local television and radio stations. While certain positions within the broadcasting industry are roughly gender-balanced, others are not, for example 81 per cent of broadcast technicians were men in 2016. Therefore slightly more men may indirectly benefit from this measure.
Support for the Audiovisual Industry Later stage (after proposals are finalized, prior to submission of proposal) Film and Television Production Firms Broadly gender-balanced No significant distributional impacts No significant intergenerational impacts or impacts generation between youth and seniors Film and Television Production Workers Policy Action Announced since the July 2020 Snapshot
  • Up to $50 million in 2020-21 for a temporary initiative to compensate for the lack of insurance coverage for
    COVID-19–related filming interruptions and production shutdowns in Canada’s audiovisual sector.
This measure primarily benefits the Canadian audiovisual production industry (e.g. film and television production), particularly its smaller firms that may be more reliant on interim financing than larger, more well-established firms. As a result, workers in this sector may benefit from increased support to their employers. While women are generally underrepresented in creative roles on film and television productions (e.g. writers, cinematographers, directors), they are overrepresented in other production roles, including costume designers, hair and makeup specialists, script supervisors, accountants and communications specialists.
Air Sector Mid-point (when proposals are being finalized), and/or later stage (after proposals are finalized, prior to proposal submission). Businesses in the Air Sector 60 percent - 79 percent men Somewhat benefits high income individuals (Somewhat regressive) No significant intergenerational impacts or impacts generation between youth and seniors Remote Communities, Employees in the Air Sector New in this Fall Economic Statement
  • Up to $206 million over two years, starting in 2020-21, to the Regional Development Agencies for a new Regional Air Transportation Initiative;
  • $186 million over two years, starting in 2021-22, for the Airports Capital Assistance Program to support small and regional airports in making critical investments in health and safety infrastructure;
  • $500 million over six years, starting in 2020-21, to establish a new transfer payment program to support large airports in making critical investments in safety, security and transit infrastructure;
  • $229 million in rent relief to 21 airport authorities, with comparable treatment for Ports Toronto, which operates Billy Bishop Toronto City Airport; and
  • $65 million in 2021-22 in financial support to airport authorities to manage the financial implications of reduced air travel.
This support will benefit: people who rely on the air sector for travel, who tend to be higher-income; people who rely on the air sector for goods, who tend to be Indigenous people in remote communities; and, people who rely on the air sector for employment, who, for the, majority tend to be men. 
Canadian air passengers tend to be middle- to higher-income, and skew slightly towards men. There is great variance in jobs and income of those employed in the air sector with salaries ranging considerably. Census data from 2016 indicate that the majority of air transport workers are men (58 per cent), with men dominating the most lucrative employment streams, such as pilots (93 per cent). For rural and remote areas in particular, the supply chain and connectivity associated with the air sector is critical to community economic activity and all population groups. 
Strategic Innovation Fund Later stage (after proposals are finalized, prior to submission of proposal) Innovative Companies 60 percent - 79 percent men Somewhat benefits high income individuals (Somewhat regressive) No significant intergenerational impacts or impacts generation between youth and seniors Workers in STEM Fields New in this Fall Economic Statement
  • $250 million over 5 years, starting in 2021-22 (cash basis), for the Strategic Innovation Fund to help support large-scale transformative projects led by innovative firms and industries across the Canadian economy.
Funding provided through the Strategic Innovation Fund is open to all sectors of the economy and all regions of Canada and is not targeted at any specific sub-group of Canadians. Given the nature of some of the projects supported by the program, there could be a higher proportion of direct benefits that accrue to workers in highly innovative sectors of the economy or in science, technology, engineering and mathematics (STEM) fields. This could result in slightly greater direct benefits for men and higher income individuals given the traditional demographics of these sectors. For instance, in 2016, 23 per cent of Canadian science and technology workers, aged 25 to 64, were women. Statistics Canada’s 2016 census data indicates that the average employment income of STEM workers was approximately $20,000 higher than that of the average non-STEM worker.
To help achieve broader based benefits, the Strategic Innovation Fund’s project assessment framework considers not only the economic and innovation value of a particular project, but also any public benefit that may accrue, including the degree to which a project proposal includes gender sensitive initiatives, has considered Indigenous impacts and opportunities and has inclusive plans to encourage diversity in the work place.
Canada Emergency Response Benefit 4-week Extension Mid-point (when proposals are being finalized), and/or later stage (after proposals are finalized, prior to proposal submission). All Canadians 60 percent - 79 percent women Somewhat benefits low income individuals (Somewhat progressive) No significant intergenerational impacts or impacts generation between youth and seniors Immigrants, Visible Minorities, Self-employed Workers Policy Action Announced since the July 2020 Snapshot
  • $8 billion in 2020-21 to extend the Canada Emergency Response Benefit by an additional four weeks, providing a new maximum of up to 28 weeks of benefits to Canadians whose employment situation was affected by COVID-19.
The Canada Emergency Response Benefit (CERB) provided direct income support to Canadians who stopped working or whose work hours were reduced due to COVID-19. This support measure was available to Canadian workers who were eligible for EI, as well as many of those not eligible for EI. The CERB was expected to be accessed by a broad cross‑section of Canadians over the course of the COVID-19 response. Impacts and take-up rates to date discussed here are taken from Statistics Canada’s September 2020 Labour Force Survey.
While men accounted for a slightly larger share of CERB claimants for the first 24 weeks of the program, in September women accounted for 54.8 per cent of the beneficiaries while men accounted for 45.2 per cent. Youth have also had higher application rates for the CERB relative to other age groups, reflecting greater employment impacts. Similarly, immigrants (13 per cent) had higher beneficiary rates than those born in Canada (8 per cent) and visible minorities (14 per cent) had higher beneficiary rates than those who are not visible minorities (8 per cent). The significant impact of the crisis on employment in the accommodation and food services industry resulted in the highest application rate for the CERB, with 25.7 per cent of those employed in the industry still applying for the CERB in September. The rebound in self-employment has been slower than for employees. As a result, 19.2 per cent of self-employed workers applied for the CERB in September, compared to only 8.2 per cent of private sector and 7.8 per cent of public sector employees.
Support for Main Street Businesses Mid-point (when proposals are being finalized), and/or later stage (after proposals are finalized, prior to proposal submission). Small and Medium-sized Businesses 60 percent - 79 percent men No significant distributional impacts No significant intergenerational impacts or impacts generation between youth and seniors Small and Medium-sized Businesses Policy Action Announced since the July 2020 Snapshot
  • $46.5 million over two years to support main street businesses. Funding supports shop local initiatives as well as the Canada United Small Business Relief Fund, which provides grants that help keep their business open while ensuring their customers are safe.
The direct benefits of this measure are likely to accrue more to men than women. As of 2017, 63 per cent of small and medium-sized businesses are majority-owned by men and 16 per cent are majority-owned by women, 12 per cent of these businesses were majority visible minority-owned, and 1.4 per cent were majority Indigenous-owned. Priority applicants for grant funding consideration under the Canada United initiative will include businesses owned by Indigenous people, women, racialized Canadians, LGBTQ2 people and persons with disabilities. Support will be available across the country, through funding to provincial and territorial chambers of commerce to collaborate with key stakeholders in their communities to develop or enhance awareness building campaigns that promote local businesses.
Veterans Emergency Fund Mid-point (when proposals are being finalized), and/or later stage (after proposals are finalized, prior to proposal submission). Veterans 60 percent - 79 percent men No significant distributional impacts No significant intergenerational impacts or impacts generation between youth and seniors Families of Veterans New in this Fall Economic Statement
  • $600,000 in 2020-21 for the Veterans Emergency Fund to provide financial support to veterans.
The Veterans Emergency Fund provides temporary assistance to veterans and their families who are facing a financial crisis or an emergency that threatens their health and well-being. As the veteran population is predominately men, more men submit applications for support than women. However, the proportion of men and women applicants is proportionate to the overall Canadian veteran population. Family members, including children, are expected to benefit from the assistance provided through the Veterans Emergency Fund.
Support for Veterans’ Organizations Mid-point (when proposals are being finalized), and/or later stage (after proposals are finalized, prior to proposal submission). Veterans 60 percent - 79 percent men No significant distributional impacts No significant intergenerational impacts or impacts generation between youth and seniors Families of Veterans Policy Action Announced since the July 2020 Snapshot
  • Funding of $20 million in 2020-21 for Veterans Affairs Canada to create a temporary Veterans Organizations Emergency Support Fund.
This initiative is expected to primarily benefit veterans and their immediate families. Veterans are more likely than the Canadian general population to suffer from a range of health problems, including mental health issues. Because the members of the Canadian Armed Forces are primarily men, the direct beneficiaries of organizations supported by the Fund are predominantly men. Spouses and partners of Canada’s veterans, who are mostly women, could also benefit indirectly from the initiative. By tackling issues facing veterans (e.g. more vulnerable to being homeless, mental health conditions and challenges with transition from military to civilian life), their spouses’ and partners’ well-being will also be affected in a positive way, especially if they are their main caregivers.
Additional Support for Food Banks and Local Food Organizations Early in the idea development phase (when proposals are being developed) Canadians Experiencing Food Insecurity Broadly gender-balanced Strongly benefits low income individuals (Strongly progressive) No significant intergenerational impacts or impacts generation between youth and seniors People with Disabilities, Single Parents, Racialized Canadians, Indigenous People Policy Action Announced since the July 2020 Snapshot
  • An additional $100 million in 2020-21 to support food banks and other hunger relief and service organizations to help address food insecurity.
According to the Canadian Community Health Survey, approximately 1 in 8 Canadians experience food insecurity regularly, with instances occurring disproportionately among single-parent households, of which the majority are women-led, Indigenous households, racialized households, and individuals with disabilities. In a typical month in 2019, more than 1 million vulnerable Canadians visited food banks. The 2019 Hunger Count Report from Food Banks Canada also notes that children represent 34.1 per cent of food bank users, despite accounting for only 19.1 per cent of the general population, and that food bank use among those over the age of 65 has seen the fastest rise in recent years. As a result of the COVID-19 pandemic, hunger relief organizations in some cities have reported an increase in demand of up to 50 per cent, with much of the increase attributable to first-time users. 
Addressing Gender-based Violence During COVID-19 Later stage (after proposals are finalized, prior to submission of proposal) Survivors of Domestic Violence Predominantly women (e.g. 80 percent or more women) No significant distributional impacts No significant intergenerational impacts or impacts generation between youth and seniors Indigenous Peoples, LGBTQ2 People, Newcomers, Children Policy Action Announced since the July 2020 Snapshot
  • $100 million in 2020-21 to fund surge capacity and associated services to combat gender-based violence in women’s shelters, sexual assault centres and women’s organizations.
Evidence shows that disaster and crisis situations – such as the COVID-19 pandemic – can lead to a rise in gender-based violence. While it can be difficult to collect data due to underreporting, the United Nations estimates that domestic violence cases have increased globally by about 30 per cent since the start of the pandemic. To make sure that women, gender-diverse people, LGBTQ2 people and children have access to the critical supports and protections they need, the government is providing additional support for women’s shelters, sexual assault centres and organizations that provide support and services to those experiencing gender-based violence, as well as Indigenous women’s gender-based violence services operating off-reserve.
Measure GBA+
Timing
Target
Population
Expected Direct Benefits Included in or Announced:
Gender Income Distribution Inter- generational Additional
Characteristics
Early, Later
or Existing
Men – Women Strongly benefits
Low – High
Benefits
Youth –Senior
   
Chapter 3 - Building Back Better: A Plan to Conquer the COVID-19 Recession
Investments in Workforce Development Agreements with Provinces and Territories Mid-point (when proposals are being finalized), and/or later stage (after proposals are finalized, prior to proposal submission). Workers, Unemployed Canadians Broadly gender-balanced Somewhat benefits low income individuals (Somewhat progressive) Primarily benefits youth, children and/or future generations Unemployed, Workers in Hard-hit Sectors Policy Action Announced since the July 2020 Snapshot
  • $1.5 billion in 2020-21 in additional funding for the Workforce Development Agreements (WDA) with provinces and territories to offer Canadians the skills training and employment supports they need.
These new incremental funds are intended to help Canadians looking to re-enter the workforce, particularly workers and employers in hard-hit sectors and groups disadvantaged as a result of the pandemic. This funding will allow workers who are not eligible for EI, often women, to access training. The WDAs also include specific funding targeted for persons with disabilities, and can also be used to provide supports to members of underrepresented groups such as Indigenous peoples, youth, older workers and newcomers to Canada.
Anonymized socioeconomic data —such as age, gender identity, disabilities, Indigenous identity and immigration status — on persons assisted through the Workforce Development Agreements in 2020-21 will be reported through ongoing agreement data collection and reporting processes.     
Training Supports for Vulnerable Populations Mid-point (when proposals are being finalized), and/or later stage (after proposals are finalized, prior to proposal submission). Women and Other Underrepresented Groups 60 percent - 79 percent women Somewhat benefits low income individuals (Somewhat progressive) No significant intergenerational impacts or impacts generation between youth and seniors Indigenous Peoples, Persons with Disabilities, and Recent Newcomers New in this Fall Economic Statement
  • $274.2 million over two years, starting in 2021-22, to bolster training supports for populations hardest hit by the pandemic, including racialized women, Indigenous peoples, persons with disabilities and recent newcomers to Canada.
These measures will benefit women, new Canadians, Indigenous peoples and persons with disabilities through the provision of enhanced training and skills development supports. Specifically, these measures will provide targeted training and employment supports to marginalized women who face labour market challenges due to race, disability, sexual orientation or other extended detachment from the labour force. Indigenous people are expected to benefit from enhancements to Indigenous labour market programming, and the measures will also ensure improved employment, job quality and career advancement for persons with disabilities, facilitating workplaces that are more accessible and inclusive. The measures will also benefit recent newcomers to Canada by scaling up and expanding existing supports for labour market integration.
An Action Plan for Women in the Economy Mid-point (when proposals are being finalized), and/or later stage (after proposals are finalized, prior to proposal submission). Women, All Canadians Predominantly women (e.g. 80 percent or more women) No significant distributional impacts No significant intergenerational impacts or impacts generation between youth and seniors Racialized
Women
New in this Fall Economic Statement
  • $850,000 over two years, starting in 2020-21, to introduce an Action Plan for Women in the Economy to help more women get back into the workforce and to ensure a feminist, intersectional response to this pandemic and recovery.
Women have been affected disproportionately by the COVID-19 crisis in the labour market. The nature of the COVID-19 shock and the restrictions imposed have led to more severe job impacts in service sectors, which employ large numbers of women, as well as disruptions to the availability of child care, creating further barriers to women’s labour force participation.  Job gains in recent months have served to equalize the employment losses among men and women. That said, women continue to face specific challenges as a result of the pandemic. For example, mothers with very young children have seen a slower recovery in employment compared to fathers, highlighting the disproportionate burden on women as caregivers.  According to a national poll by Oxfam Canada conducted in June 2020, 71 per cent of women surveyed reported feeling more anxious, depressed, isolated, overworked, or ill because of having to shoulder even more unpaid care work as a result of the COVID-19 crisis. Indigenous and Black Canadians reported greater challenges due to increased house and care work caused by COVID-19 than their white peers. Indigenous respondents were three times as likely as white respondents to say they have had to give up looking for paid work as a result of increased care responsibilities. This measure will benefit all Canadians by ensuring that the government’s stimulus and recovery plan is feminist, intersectional and targets specific needs and challenges to re-gaining full employment.
Towards a Canada-wide Early Learning and Child Care System Mid-point (when proposals are being finalized), and/or later stage (after proposals are finalized, prior to proposal submission). Parents of Pre-school and School-aged Kids Predominantly women (e.g. 80 percent or more women) No significant distributional impacts No significant intergenerational impacts or impacts generation between youth and seniors  Children and Parents, Early Childhood Educators New in this Fall Economic Statement
  • $1.5 billion over eight years, starting in 2021-22, with $889.3 million per year ongoing for key early investments to lay the groundwork for a Canada-wide early learning and child care system, in partnership with provinces, territories and Indigenous Peoples.   
The provision of child care services could help more women enter and remain in the labour force – particularly mothers of young children. Due to cultural expectations and norms, child care responsibilities disproportionately fall to women and can constrain women’s professional and educational choices. Research shows that child care availability and cost strongly affect mothers’ decisions to enter or stay in the labour market or in school, and there is evidence that this has been more acute during the pandemic.  The experience of Quebec, which significantly expanded its child care system beginning in the late 1990s, shows the impact of these kinds of investments on the labour market. By 2019, maternal labour force participation rates were 5 to 9 percentage points higher than in the rest of Canada. In addition to helping women and families, increased maternal labour force participation is good for economic growth and increased GDP per capita.
High-quality child care also benefits children by playing an important role in improving children’s cognitive abilities and socio-emotional development, increasing school readiness and educational attainment, reducing poverty and improving social mobility. Indigenous partners will be engaged in the development of new investments in child care for First Nations, Inuit and Métis children that is culturally appropriate and meets the unique needs of Indigenous children and families.
This measure is providing substantial new support for the recruitment and retention of early childhood educators, who will form a critical part of an expanded Canadian early learning and child care system that provides high-quality care to children. Support for child care sectors – with businesses that tend to be women-owned and a workforce of early childhood educators which is around 96 per cent women – could make a meaningful impact on the economic equality of women post-COVID-19.
Immediate Support for Families with Children Mid-point (when proposals are being finalized), and/or later stage (after proposals are finalized, prior to proposal submission). Families with Children Under Six 60 percent - 79 percent women Somewhat benefits low income individuals (Somewhat progressive) Primarily benefits youth, children and/or future generations   New in this Fall Economic Statement
  • Payment totaling $1,200 per child under age 6 to families entitled to the Canada Child Benefit (CCB) with incomes at or below $120,000 and $600 per child under 6 to CCB-entitled families with incomes above $120,000.
This measure will provide temporary support totaling $1,200 per child under age 6 to CCB-entitled families with incomes at or below $120,000 and $600 per child under 6 to CCB-entitled families with incomes above $120,000, to be delivered as four tax-free payments of $300/$150, with the first payment being made shortly after the enabling legislation is passed and subsequent payments in the months of April, July and October 2021.
The payment will be provided to about 1.6 million families, particularly low- and middle-income families with children under age 6. It is estimated that approximately one-quarter of the payment will be provided to families with net incomes under $30,000.
This measure is expected to benefit children and their parents in providing for the costs of raising children. Single parents entitled to the CCB will receive a larger average benefit from this measure than couples because almost all of them have net income below $120,000, qualifying them for the maximum temporary support of $1,200 per child under age 6. Single parents will receive approximately $1,500 on average from this measure in 2021. This assistance will be particularly helpful for low-income families with young children, including those living in poverty. Since the CCB is paid to the female parent (where only one is present in the household) in the vast majority of cases, the new payment will be provided to the same recipient in the family as the CCB and thus will directly benefit women, particularly those aged 30-49. When taking into account that the additional support is intended for the benefit of the children, the overall gender impacts of the measure are expected to be more even.
Enhancing Canada Summer Jobs Funding Early in the idea development phase (when proposals are being developed) Young Canadians 60 percent - 79 percent women No significant distributional impacts Primarily benefits youth, children and/or future generations Students New in this Fall Economic Statement
  • $447.5 million in 2021-22, to help continue and increase job placements through the Canada Summer Jobs program, in addition to a one-year continuation of the program flexibilities introduced in 2020-21.
This measure will benefit Canadians aged 15 to 30 years by supporting up to 120,000 job placements through Canada Summer Jobs in 2021-22. Specifically, this measure will support an increase of 40,000 new job placements in 2021-22 (from 80,000 in 2020-21 to 120,000 in 2021-22). The pandemic has disproportionately affected youth, particularly those facing barriers to employment, such as Indigenous youth and youth with disabilities. The measure will benefit youth by providing quality paid work experience placements, improving access to the labour market for those who face unique barriers and providing opportunities to develop and improve skills. This measure is expected to help young women build resiliency and connections to the labour market as Canada Summer Jobs has traditionally served almost twice as many young women as young men. The program’s wide eligibility criteria, which were broadened in 2019 to reach all youth aged 15 to 30 rather than only students, will also enable increased access for youth facing barriers to employment.
Youth Employment and Skills Strategy Mid-point (when proposals are being finalized), and/or later stage (after proposals are finalized, prior to proposal submission). Young Canadians Broadly gender-balanced No significant distributional impacts Primarily benefits youth, children and/or future generations Underrepresented Youth New in this Fall Economic Statement
  • $575 million over two years, starting in 2021-22, to help continue and increase job placements through the Youth Employment and Skills Strategy.
This measure will benefit Canadians aged 15 to 30 by supporting up to 45,300 job placements – an increase of approximately 17,500 job placements – through the Youth Employment and Skills Strategy. The pandemic has disproportionately affected youth, particularly those facing barriers to employment, such as Indigenous youth, racialized youth and youth with disabilities. This measure is expected to benefit youth by increasing the number of available work placements and providing youth with the skills and real-life work experience needed to succeed in the workforce. The creation of new work placements is expected to support underrepresented youth, including racialized and Indigenous youth.
Eliminating Interest on Canada Student Loans Mid-point (when proposals are being finalized), and/or later stage (after proposals are finalized, prior to proposal submission). Students and Youth 60 percent - 79 percent women Somewhat benefits low income individuals (Somewhat progressive) Primarily benefits youth, children and/or future generations   New in this Fall Economic Statement
  • Provide $329.4 million in relief to recent graduates by eliminating interest on repayment of the federal portion of the Canada Student Loans and Canada Apprentice Loans for 2021-2022
The Canada Student Loans Program (CSLP) targets support to students from low- and middle-income families, who tend to graduate with higher overall debt levels. The one-year removal of interest charges on Canada Student Loans and Canada Apprentice Loans will primarily affect recent graduates from these backgrounds. In particular, 74 per cent of borrowers with outstanding loans are under the age of 35, and individuals under age 35 make up 75 per cent of users under the program’s Repayment Assistance Plan (RAP), which provides financial relief to those having difficulty making payments. Women make up 61 per cent of the CSLP borrowers. The temporary removal of interest charges is also expected to benefit recent graduates with disabilities: in 2017-18, 37 per cent of borrowers with disabilities were RAP users. This is in contrast to the program-wide rate of RAP use at 29 per cent.
Universal Broadband Fund: Acceleration and Top-Up Mid-point (when proposals are being finalized), and/or later stage (after proposals are finalized, prior to proposal submission). Rural and Remote Communities Broadly gender-balanced Somewhat benefits low income individuals (Somewhat progressive) No significant intergenerational impacts or impacts generation between youth and seniors Indigenous Peoples Policy Action Announced since the July 2020 Snapshot
  • The government will accelerate the delivery of the $1 billion announced in Budget 2019 for the Universal Broadband Fund (UBF) and will allocate an additional $750 million over five years to the UBF to support large-scale broadband projects in rural and remote communities.
High-speed Internet will provide benefits to Canadians living in rural and remote communities. Only 41 per cent of households in rural areas have access to internet speeds of 50/10 megabits per second (Mbps) compared to nearly 100 per cent of households in large urban areas. Similarly, Indigenous communities located in remote areas can expect to benefit from faster speeds and improved access to online services related to health, public safety and government services in addition to other benefits and opportunities from faster and more reliable internet access.
Compensation for Supply-managed Dairy, Poultry and Egg Farmers Mid-point (when proposals are being finalized), and/or later stage (after proposals are finalized, prior to proposal submission). Dairy, Poultry and Egg Farmers 60 percent - 79 percent men Strongly benefits high income individuals (Strongly regressive) No significant intergenerational impacts or impacts generation between youth and seniors   New in this Fall Economic Statement
  • $2.1 billion to deliver on the government’s commitment to provide full and fair compensation to supply-managed farmers in relation to the Canada-European Union Comprehensive Economic and Trade Agreement (CETA) and the Comprehensive and Progressive Agreement for Trans-Pacific Partnership (CPTPP)
This compensation will benefit dairy, poultry and egg farmers according to their ownership or production quota. Farming is generally an industry dominated by men, with 60 percent of all farms having men-only operators, 7 per cent having women-only operators, and 33 per cent being operated by both men and women. For dairy and poultry farms, 55 per cent and 50 per cent respectively are men-only operated, 2 per cent and 10 per cent respectively are women-only operated, while 43 per cent and 40 per cent respectively are operated by both men and women (this data may not fully indicate the extent of women’s participation on farms, as it does not account for family members who work on farm but are not designated as the farm operator). Supply-managed farms are primarily located in British Columbia, Ontario, and Quebec.
Dairy, poultry and egg farmers maintain above-average annual net operating incomes within the farming sector at $144,747 (2018 - dairy) and $209,438 (2018 - poultry and egg), compared to the 2018 sector average of $77,883. While average net operating income is higher for dairy, poultry and egg farms, compared to agriculture as a whole, this does not represent all dairy, poultry and egg operations, as profitability varies across farm sizes and regions. Dairy farm families and poultry and egg farm families have average family incomes ($183,036 and $244,143 respectively) that are also higher than the farm family income average for the whole agriculture sector of $166,682.
Additionally, some research shows that the supply-management system results in elevated consumer prices for products such as milk, poultry, and eggs, which disproportionately and negatively impacts low-income Canadians who must spend a higher proportion of their income on basic necessities such as milk, poultry, and eggs.
Black Entrepreneurship Program Early in the idea development phase (when proposals are being developed) Black Entrepreneurs 60 percent - 79 percent men Somewhat benefits low income individuals (Somewhat progressive) No significant intergenerational impacts or impacts generation between youth and seniors Black Canadians Policy Action Announced since the July 2020 Snapshot
  • Up to $92.9 million over four years, starting in 2020-21, to develop and implement a National Ecosystem Fund, to create a Black Entrepreneurship Loan Fund, and to create a Black Entrepreneurship Knowledge Hub.
Black Canadians are statistically more likely to live in low-income environments and reside in urban areas. Approximately 1 in 5 Black Canadians, versus just over 1 in 10 for the Canadian population as a whole, live in low-income environments. Further, as Black Canadians largely reside in metropolitan cities rather than rural areas (94.3 per cent of Black Canadians live in urban areas, compared to 71.2 per cent for the country as a whole), the program is likely to be concentrated on those in urban areas and may also benefit participants from low-income environments.
Canada has a gender gap in the field of entrepreneurship: about 16 per cent of small and medium enterprises are majority women-owned, as compared to 63 per cent majority men-owned. It is therefore expected that many recipients under this business development program will be men. Program elements will be designed to support gender-diverse accessibility and promote diverse participation.
Diversity in Procurement Mid-point (when proposals are being finalized), and/or later stage (after proposals are finalized, prior to proposal submission). Black Entrepreneurs Broadly gender-balanced No significant distributional impacts No significant intergenerational impacts or impacts generation between youth and seniors Canadian Businesses New in this Fall Economic Statement
  • The department of Public Services and Procurement Canada will be launching a pilot program to open bidding opportunities for Black owned/operated businesses.
The Government of Canada is committed to increasing economic prospects for all Canadians. This pilot program will advance this objective by helping Black Canadians secure important economic opportunities as part of the government procurements process. The results of the pilot will assist the department in examining greater opportunities for supplier diversity across the government.
Building a Corporate Canada that looks like Canada Mid-point (when proposals are being finalized), and/or later stage (after proposals are finalized, prior to proposal submission). Women and other Underrepresented Groups Predominantly women (e.g. 80 percent or more women) Somewhat benefits high income individuals (Somewhat regressive) No significant intergenerational impacts or impacts generation between youth and seniors Racialized Canadians New in this Fall Economic Statement
  • $33 million over three years, starting in 2021-22 to develop the 50-30 Challenge in collaboration with diversity seeking and serving groups and business stakeholders. The 50-30 Challenge asks private and public sector organizations – including small and medium enterprises, not-for-profits and academic institutions – to voluntarily take steps to increase diverse representation on corporate boards and in senior management.
The 50-30 Challenge is expected to generate positive impacts for women, racialized persons, people with disabilities, Indigenous peoples and members of LGBTQ2 communities. The program encourages organizations to ensure that more women and members of marginalized groups are present on boards or are hired into senior management positions. Given the focus on improving representation in senior leadership positions, which are often high-income positions, higher-income individuals are also expected to disproportionately benefit.
 Task Force on Modernizing the Employment Equity Act & Workplace Opportunities and Barriers to Equity Program Expansion Early in the idea development phase (when proposals are being developed) All Canadians 60 percent - 79 percent women No significant distributional impacts No significant intergenerational impacts or impacts generation between youth and seniors Indigenous, LGBTQ2 people, Visible Minorities, Underrepresented Groups New in this Fall Economic Statement
  • $6.6 million in 2021-22 and $3.6 million per year ongoing to modernize the Employment Equity Act to better reflect Canada’s diversity.
While all Canadians are expected to benefit, members of employment equity and related groups like members of LGBTQ2 communities who work in federally regulated sectors will specifically benefit from the task force’s recommendations. In addition, this measure expands the Workplace Opportunities and Barriers to Equity Program, allowing more projects supporting increased awareness of employment barriers and improved representation of designated groups to be funded.
Centre for Diversity in the Federal Public Service Mid-point (when proposals are being finalized), and/or later stage (after proposals are finalized, prior to proposal submission). Women and Other Underrepresented Groups Predominantly women (e.g. 80 percent or more women) Somewhat benefits high income individuals (Somewhat regressive) No significant intergenerational impacts or impacts generation between youth and seniors Underrepresented Groups within the Federal Public Service New in this Fall Economic Statement
  • Up to $12 million over three years, starting in 2020-21, to conduct key activities in support of diversity and inclusion across the public service.
The Centre for Diversity in the Federal Public Service, within the Treasury Board Secretariat, will focus on organizational supports for departments and agencies in their efforts to improve diversity and inclusion in the public service. The primary target client group is federal public servants, in particular racialized people, women, Indigenous peoples, persons with a disability, LGBTQ2 people and other identities. The expected impacts include improved representation of the above groups, increased recruitment, promotion and retention of diverse employees, broader awareness of diversity issues, greater senior management accountability for diversity and inclusion and reduced harassment and discrimination.
Supporting Community-led Initiatives that combat Racism and promote Multiculturalism Mid-point (when proposals are being finalized), and/or later stage (after proposals are finalized, prior to proposal submission). Ethnic, Linguistic, Cultural or Religious Minorities, and Indigenous Peoples Broadly gender-balanced Somewhat benefits low income individuals (Somewhat progressive) No significant intergenerational impacts or impacts generation between youth and seniors  Racialized and Marginalized Communities New in this Fall Economic Statement
  • $50 million over two years, starting in 2021-22, to bolster supports for community-based programs that combat systemic racism and religious discrimination.
This new support aims to benefit communities that have experienced racism and discrimination, such as racialized groups, religious minorities and Indigenous peoples. The COVID-19 pandemic has only exacerbated long-standing social and economic barriers for racialized and marginalized communities, many of which face disproportionate rates of unemployment, underemployment or precarious employment. Funding will be delivered directly to community-based programs to combat systemic racism in all its forms – including systemic barriers to employment, justice and social participation among Indigenous peoples, racialized communities and religious minorities.
Protecting Communities at Risk of Hate-motivated Crimes Mid-point (when proposals are being finalized), and/or later stage (after proposals are finalized, prior to proposal submission). Potential Victims of Hate Crimes, All Canadians Broadly gender-balanced No significant distributional impacts No significant intergenerational impacts or impacts generation between youth and seniors Marginalized Groups New in this Fall Economic Statement
  • $13 million over five years, starting in 2021-22, and $2.6 million ongoing to protect communities at risk of hate‑motivated crimes.
The Communities at Risk: Security Infrastructure Program helps communities at risk of hate-motivated crime improve the security infrastructure of their gathering places, such as places of worship, schools and community centres. According to Statistics Canada, between 2014 and 2018, race and ethnicity were the most common motivation for police‑reported hate crimes, making up about 46 per cent of cases. This was followed by religion at 36 per cent and sex and sexual orientation at 13 per cent. This investment will enhance the safety of these populations and can include lighting, alarm systems, fences or surveillance cameras.  
Impact of Race and Culture Assessments in Sentencing Mid-point (when proposals are being finalized), and/or later stage (after proposals are finalized, prior to proposal submission). Black Canadians 60 percent - 79 percent men No significant distributional impacts Primarily benefits youth, children and/or future generations Racialized Canadians New in this Fall Economic Statement
  • $6.6 million over five years, starting in 2021-22, and $1.6 million ongoing to implement an Impact of Race and Culture Assessment component of Justice Canada’s Legal Aid Program.
Impact of Race and Culture Assessments are pre-sentencing reports that help to address the unique circumstances and racism that Black Canadians and other racialized Canadians encounter that contribute to their experience in the criminal justice system. As cited by the Office of the Correctional Investigator, Black Canadians face profiling at every stage of the criminal justice system, from charging to sentencing to harsher treatment in correctional institutions. Black Canadians are overrepresented in the justice system, representing 3.5 per cent of the population, yet constituting 7.2 per cent of federal inmates. This measure results in better informed sentencing decisions based on an understanding of the adversities and systemic inequalities that some Black Canadians and members of other racialized groups face.  
Supporting Community Justice Centres Mid-point (when proposals are being finalized), and/or later stage (after proposals are finalized, prior to proposal submission). All Canadians 60 percent - 79 percent men No significant distributional impacts No significant intergenerational impacts or impacts generation between youth and seniors Indigenous Peoples New in this Fall Economic Statement
  • $28.6 million over five years, starting in 2021-22, to support Community Justice Centre pilot projects in British Columbia, Manitoba and Ontario, as well as consultations to expand the Community Justice Centre concept to other provinces and territories.
In regions where Community Justice Centres (CJCs) operate, these sites can support all Canadians involved in the justice system. It is anticipated that CJCs will disproportionately benefit men. According to Statistics Canada, in 2017-18, 73 per cent of accused persons in adult criminal cases were men.
In addition, according to the Office of the Correctional Investigator, as of 2020, Indigenous peoples account for over 30 per cent of the incarcerated population, while only making up 5 per cent of the general Canadian population. Furthermore, since April 2010, the Indigenous inmate population has increased by 43.4 per cent whereas the non-Indigenous incarcerated population has declined over the same period by 13.7 per cent. The target population of some of the CJC pilot projects will be Indigenous peoples to help reduce the overrepresentation of this group in the criminal justice system.
2021-2023 Immigration Levels Plan Mid-point (when proposals are being finalized), and/or later stage (after proposals are finalized, prior to proposal submission). Newcomers Broadly gender-balanced No significant distributional impacts No significant intergenerational impacts or impacts generation between youth and seniors Employers,
Separated Families
Policy Action Announced since the July 2020 Snapshot
  • $750.3 million over five years, starting in 2021-22, to support an increase in permanent resident admissions targets from 2021 to 2023.
Over the long-term, as Canada’s population ages and exits the workforce in greater numbers, immigration will play a critical role in population and labour force growth. Immigration also brings more immediate contributions, especially in sectors and regions where employers are looking to fill openings in in-demand occupations and resolve labour shortages. Based on historic trends, the anticipated numbers of new permanent residents admitted to Canada under this initiative are expected to be evenly distributed between women and men. It is expected that the largest increase in admissions will be in the Economic Class, followed by the Refugees and Protected Persons Class, the Family Class, and the Humanitarian and Compassionate & Other provision. In 2019, 51 per cent of all permanent residents admitted to Canada were women while 49 per cent were men. Within this dataset, there is a notable difference between genders for those who applied as principal applicants in the Economic Class. There is also a higher proportion of women sponsored under the Family Reunification category.  With its focus on economic immigration, the gender balance of the admissions may reflect the gender composition of various labour sectors.
Rapid Housing Initiative Later stage (after proposals are finalized, prior to submission of proposal) Individuals at
Risk of Homelessness
60 percent - 79 percent men Strongly benefits low income individuals (Strongly progressive) No significant intergenerational impacts or impacts generation between youth and seniors Indigenous Peoples, Women, Racialized Canadians New in this Fall Economic Statement
  • $1 billion to establish a Rapid Housing Initiative (RHI) which will provide funding to create up to 3,000 new permanent, affordable housing units.
The RHI will support affordable housing to help address key housing gaps faced by vulnerable Canadians. Designed to be a flexible program, it is expected the RHI will address housing needs of vulnerable Canadians, including seniors, people with disabilities, women and their children, Indigenous peoples, LGBTQ2 people, racialized people and those who are most affected by precarious housing and the economic fallout from COVID-19.  In 2016, women comprised about half of all persons living in unsuitable housing, as did about one-fifth of Indigenous people in Canada. Over 50 per cent of racialized households in Canada live in homes that are unaffordable, crowded or require major repair. This compares to 28 per cent of non-racialized households. This investment will promote economic activity in the housing sector, resulting in indirect benefits to workers in the residential construction industry who are predominantly men.
Expanding the Rental Construction Financing Initiative Mid-point (when proposals are being finalized), and/or later stage (after proposals are finalized, prior to proposal submission). Renters 60 percent - 79 percent women No significant distributional impacts No significant intergenerational impacts or impacts generation between youth and seniors   New in this Fall Economic Statement
  • $10.5 billion over five years, starting in 2021-22 on a cash basis ($458.3 million on an accrual basis) to expand the existing Rental Construction Financing Initiative.
Approximately 30 per cent of Canadians live in rented housing, especially low-to-moderate income families in large cities, including seniors, young professionals, one-parent households, and immigrants.
This measure is expected to have positive impacts for women, recent immigrants, lone-parent or senior households who often struggle to find affordable rental housing, especially in major urban centres. Where this measure enables stable and affordable rental housing for families, children could be indirect beneficiaries. The measure is also expected to provide more suitable housing for Canadians with accessibility challenges, given a minimum proportion of funded units must meet local accessible design requirements.
First-Time Home Buyer Incentive Expansion Mid-point (when proposals are being finalized), and/or later stage (after proposals are finalized, prior to proposal submission). First-Time Home Buyers Broadly gender-balanced No significant distributional impacts Primarily benefits youth, children and/or future generations People in Toronto, Vancouver, and Victoria New in this Fall Economic Statement
  • Expand eligibility to the First-Time Home Buyer Incentive by raising the annual qualifying income limit from $120,000 to $150,000 and the loan-to-income limit from 4 times to 4.5 times in the Toronto, Vancouver, and Victoria regions. Current program parameters will be maintained for the rest of Canada. No new funding is required.
The First-Time Home Buyer Incentive facilitates access to the housing market with the expectation that millennials and new Canadians will be the main beneficiaries of the program. As of September 30, 2020, 79 per cent of approved applications have a first applicant with an age between 20 and 39 years, with the median age being 32 years. Moreover, in the 12 months from July 2019 to June 2020, millennials with incomes under $120,000 represented 70 per cent of home buyers with an insured mortgage in Toronto and 65 per cent of home buyers with an insured mortgage in Vancouver. 
The program is intended to benefit middle-income first-time home buyers facing housing affordability gaps. The Incentive expansion may also favour dual-income households over single-parent households. Further, with respect to single-parent households, the Incentive may favour households led by a father over those led by a mother. This observation is based on 2016 data where the average net worth of single-parent households led by a mother was $240,000, compared to an average net worth of those led by a father of $540,000.  Proposals have the potential to spur construction, which requires local labour and is a field largely dominated by men. Men comprised 88 per cent of construction workers in 2019.  Housing being a social determinant of health, the provision of funds towards affordable housing for families could have positive impacts on long-term stable housing for children’s health and social and educational outcomes.
Prevention of Gang-related Violence Mid-point (when proposals are being finalized), and/or later stage (after proposals are finalized, prior to proposal submission). At-risk Youth, All Canadians 60 percent - 79 percent men No significant distributional impacts Primarily benefits youth, children and/or future generations Indigenous, Racialized Youth, Urban Populations New in this Fall Economic Statement
  • $250 million over five years, starting in 2021-22, for municipalities, community groups and Indigenous communities to deliver anti‑gang programming.
This funding will support the development of programming to help prevent youth from joining gangs and offer support to youth who are seeking to leave a gang. This initiative is expected to have the greatest impact on at-risk boys and young men as 94% of youth gang members are male. That said, there is also a significant number of female gang members who may be associates or intimate partners. While most existing funding to combat gang-related firearm violence is focused on deterring gang involvement for boys and men, the funding for municipalities and community groups may allow additional resources to be allocated to programs supporting women and girls. In recognition of the rise of Indigenous gang activity, the funding for municipalities to combat gang-related violence and expand diversion programs will include Indigenous communities as eligible recipients for funding.  All Canadians, particularly in urban centres, will benefit from safer communities and reduced gang activity.
Equipping RCMP Officers with Body-worn Cameras Mid-point (when proposals are being finalized), and/or later stage (after proposals are finalized, prior to proposal submission).  All Canadians 60 percent - 79 percent men No significant distributional impacts Primarily benefits youth, children and/or future generations Western and Atlantic Canada and Indigenous Communities New in this Fall Economic Statement
  • Up to $238.5 million over six years, starting in 2020-21, and $50 million ongoing to implement a National Body‑Worn Camera Program for its front-line police officers, and a Digital Evidence Management System to store and manage camera footage.
Providing body-worn cameras to RCMP officers is viewed as an important step to strengthening RCMP trust, transparency and accountability, with a focus on strengthening trust and relationships with racialized and Indigenous communities. Consultations will be undertaken to identify and address important concerns as well as to foster community support. Consultations with Indigenous groups, in particular, will seek to ensure that body‑worn cameras are implemented in a culturally respectful manner. The RCMP primarily provides contract policing services in Western and Atlantic Canada where Indigenous peoples make up a higher percentage of the population compared to Central Canada. Therefore, body‑worn cameras will disproportionately impact police interactions with Indigenous peoples. Outside of the lower mainland of British Columbia, the RCMP operates mostly rural and remote settings. The RCMP Regular Member workforce, who will wear body‑worn cameras, is predominantly white men. Polling conducted by the Association for Canadian Studies in June 2020 suggests that younger Canadians aged 18-34 are less likely to feel safe around police than those aged 35-54 as well as those aged 55+. Used as a tool to increase accountability and trust, body-worn cameras have the potential to help bridge these generational gaps.
Home Energy Retrofits Mid-point (when proposals are being finalized), and/or later stage (after proposals are finalized, prior to proposal submission). All Canadians 60 percent - 79 percent men Somewhat benefits high income individuals (Somewhat regressive) No significant intergenerational impacts or impacts generation between youth and seniors Homeowners and Landlords New in this Fall Economic Statement
  • $2.6 billion over seven years, starting in 2020-21, to help homeowners improve their home energy efficiency by providing up to 700,000 home retrofit grants of up to $5,000, up to one million free EnerGuide energy assessments, and training and recruiting energy auditors to meet increased demand.
This initiative will primarily benefit homeowners and landlords. Homeownership rates increase with income. Energy efficient homes support long-term climate objectives and improved health for occupants, while lowering monthly energy costs for homeowners, landlords and renters. In addition, the increased demand for energy auditors and retrofit contractors, which is a sector dominated by men, will create new green jobs. The training and recruitment campaign will explore measures to reduce barriers preventing or discouraging the full participation of underrepresented groups in the energy efficiency workforce, including women, Indigenous peoples and racialized Canadians.
Zero Emission Vehicle Infrastructure Mid-point (when proposals are being finalized), and/or later stage (after proposals are finalized, prior to proposal submission). Current and Upcoming Vehicle Owners 60 percent - 79 percent men Somewhat benefits high income individuals (Somewhat regressive) No significant intergenerational impacts or impacts generation between youth and seniors New in this Fall Economic Statement
  • $150 million over three years, starting in 2021-22, to deploy new recharging and refuelling infrastructure for zero-emission vehicles.
Available research indicates that the current demographics of early adopters of zero-emission vehicles (ZEVs) in Canada are more likely to be well-educated, high-income earners and men. Over time, as more consumers adopt ZEVs, and they become more affordable and more readily available to consumers, researchers expect that future ZEV vehicle purchasers will reflect the general vehicle-owning population. Air quality improvements associated with ZEV adoption are expected to benefit urban and other traffic heavy areas in the short term, while lower greenhouse gas emissions are expected to benefit all Canadians in the medium to long term.
Nature-based Climate Solutions Early in the idea development phase (when proposals are being developed) All Canadians 60 percent - 79 percent men No significant distributional impacts Primarily benefits youth, children and/or future generations Workers in Forestry, Ecosystem Conservation/ Restoration New in this Fall Economic Statement
  • $3.9 billion over ten years, starting in 2021-22, to support the implementation of nature-based solutions to climate change, including planting two billion trees and enhancing wetland, peatland, grassland and agricultural carbon sequestration potential.
This measure is expected to have broad benefits for all Canadians through the resulting reductions in greenhouse gasses, and by increasing the availability of forested and other restored natural spaces, which can have positive physical and mental health benefits, such as by providing cleaner air. Certain communities more vulnerable to the impacts of climate change will also benefit (Indigenous peoples, women, children), along with workers engaged in the sectors more directly implicated in the implementation of this initiative, including in forestry and ecosystem restoration and landscaping. Men are more likely to be employed in the jobs created by this initiative. 
Support for Commercial Tree Planting in 2020 and 2021  Mid-point (when proposals are being finalized), and/or later stage (after proposals are finalized, prior to proposal submission). Forest Sector Workers 60 percent - 79 percent men No significant distributional impacts No significant intergenerational impacts or impacts generation between youth and seniors Rural Canadians Policy Action Announced since the July 2020 Snapshot
  • $30.6 million in 2020-21 of provide financial contributions to provincial and territorial governments to support those governments’ work to offset additional costs associated with COVID-19 safety measures for small and medium-sized enterprises in the forest sector, including tree-planting operations.
While most forest sector workers are older men, the representation of tree planters skews younger and more equal in the participation of men and women, along with more Indigenous people, as according to Employment and Social Development Canada, their participation is highest in the silviculture, forestry and logging sub-sectors. However, as this measure is unlikely to contribute to changes in the overall make-up of the forest sector, more direct benefits will be conferred on men.
Strategic Interties Mid-point (when proposals are being finalized), and/or later stage (after proposals are finalized, prior to proposal submission). Specific Regions 60 percent - 79 percent men No significant distributional impacts No significant intergenerational impacts or impacts generation between youth and seniors Electricity Sector New in this Fall Economic Statement
  • $25 million in 2021-22 to support pre-development work, such as engineering assessments, community engagement, and environmental and regulatory studies, for electricity transmission projects.
This initiative will primarily benefit the proponents and sub-contractors developing the transmission projects who are responsible for completing pre-development work. Men are more likely to benefit, as they make up the majority of the workforce in the electricity sector in Canada.
Sustainable Finance Mid-point (when proposals are being finalized), and/or later stage (after proposals are finalized, prior to proposal submission). All Canadians Broadly gender-balanced No significant distributional impacts Primarily benefits youth, children and/or future generations Employees in Green Sectors Policy Action Announced since the July 2020 Snapshot
  • $7 million over three years for the Department of Finance and Environment and Climate Change Canada to establish the private-public Sustainable Finance Action Council, aimed at developing a well-functioning sustainable finance market in Canada.
The Sustainable Finance Action Council is not expected to have disproportional impacts on specific groups of Canadians in the short term.  A well-functioning sustainable finance market will be of benefit to many Canadians, by helping to risk-manage and create value in their pension plans, investment portfolios, and other personal savings, but may disproportionately benefit men, who generally have higher levels of savings and investments. Younger Canadians and future generations are expected to benefit in the long term from this market, as increased capital flows directed at sustainable activities will help Canada transition to net-zero emissions.
Supporting Water and Wastewater Infrastructure in First Nations Communities Mid-point (when proposals are being finalized), and/or later stage (after proposals are finalized, prior to proposal submission). First Nations 60 percent - 79 percent women Strongly benefits low income individuals (Strongly progressive) No significant intergenerational impacts or impacts generation between youth and seniors First Nations Elders, Children New in this Fall Economic Statement
  • $1.5 billion starting in 2020-21, and $114.1 million ongoing to accelerate work to lift all long-term drinking water advisories and stabilize funding for water and wastewater infrastructure, including operation and maintenance costs, in First Nations communities.
Overall, resolving long-term drinking water advisories positively affects all members of First Nations communities, bringing health benefits and potentially saving money currently going toward bottled waterHowever, there will be unique benefits for certain members of the community. For example, as women play a traditional role as water keepers and are often the ones who do care work, improved access to clean, usable water will reduce the time and labour burden for them. Children and Elders, as those who are particularly vulnerable to water-borne illnesses, will also benefit.
Increased water and wastewater projects will also result in increased employment opportunities for members of First Nations communities on reserve through roles such as water operators, contractors and construction workers. As jobs in this sector are held mainly by men, Indigenous Services Canada will help ensure the inclusion of women, youth, and other vulnerable groups in employment opportunities through targeted initiatives.
Supporting Infrastructure in Indigenous Communities Early in the idea development phase (when proposals are being developed) Indigenous Peoples Broadly gender-balanced Somewhat benefits low income individuals (Somewhat progressive) No significant intergenerational impacts or impacts generation between youth and seniors Indigenous, Rural and Remote Communities New in this Fall Economic Statement
  • $25.9 million in 2020-21 to accelerate the government’s 10 year commitment to close the infrastructure gap in Indigenous communities by supporting the co-development of infrastructure plans with Indigenous partners, which will help pave the way to address critical needs in First Nations, Inuit and Métis Nation communities.
The co-development of infrastructure plans is expected to benefit all members of Indigenous communities. This initiative will support Indigenous partners in transforming housing and infrastructure service delivery in a way that is self-determined and culturally appropriate. However, Indigenous women may face challenges in attending engagement sessions due to care responsibilities for family members. Indigenous Services Canada will promote and encourage engagements that seek out the voices of women and other vulnerable groups, including youth, seniors, LGBTQ and two-spirit people and persons with disabilities.
Co-Development of Distinctions-Based Health Legislation Mid-point (when proposals are being finalized), and/or later stage (after proposals are finalized, prior to proposal submission). Indigenous Peoples Broadly gender-balanced Somewhat benefits low income individuals (Somewhat progressive) No significant intergenerational impacts or impacts generation between youth and seniors Seniors, Youth, Rural and Remote Communities New in this Fall Economic Statement
  • $15.6 million over two years, starting in 2021-22, to support the co-development of distinctions-based health legislation with First Nations, Inuit and Métis Nation partners.
Indigenous people face significant and long-standing gaps in health outcomes as compared with non‑Indigenous people. Limited access and barriers to health services and instances of systemic racism and discrimination that reduce preventative check‑ups or lead to death, misdiagnosis, unnecessary or unwanted medical interventions are just a few factors that drive health disparities in Indigenous communities. This initiative will support the co-development of potential options for distinctions-based Indigenous health legislation to improve access to high-quality and culturally relevant health care and mental health services. The co‑development process will ensure the legislation is informed by the different histories, circumstances, locations and social determinants of health and gendered perspectives of First Nations, Inuit and Métis peoples.
Mercury Treatment Centres Early in the idea development phase (when proposals are being developed) Indigenous Persons with Disabilities or Health Issues 60 percent - 79 percent women No significant distributional impacts Primarily benefits seniors or the baby boom generation Rural or Remote Populations New in this Fall Economic Statement
  • $200.1 million over five years, starting in 2021-22, and $0.3 million ongoing to support the construction and operations of two mercury treatment centres in the First Nations communities of Asubpeeschoseewagong (Grassy Narrows) and Wabaseemoong.
The mercury treatment facilities will serve clients with disabilities and health issues related to mercury poisoning from two First Nations communities. The facilities are expected to provide greater benefits to seniors and slightly greater benefits to women, who are diagnosed with chronic health problems at higher rates in the communities. Indirect beneficiaries include community members in Asubpeeschoseewagong and Wabaseemoong, due to increased employment opportunities through the construction (primarily men) and staffing (both men and women) of the facilities.
Supporting a National Action Plan for Ending Violence against Indigenous Women, Girls and LGBTQ and Two-spirit People Early in the idea development phase (when proposals are being developed) Indigenous Peoples 60 percent - 79 percent women Somewhat benefits low income individuals (Somewhat progressive) No significant intergenerational impacts or impacts generation between youth and seniors Indigenous Women, Girls and LGBTQ2 People New in this Fall Economic Statement
  • $781.5 million over five years, starting in 2021-22, and $106.3 million ongoing to combat systemic discrimination against Indigenous peoples and expand efforts to combat violence against Indigenous women, girls and LGBTQ and two-spirit people.
Indigenous women and girls are 12 times more likely to be murdered or missing than any other women in Canada. The primary beneficiaries of this measure will be those most affected by gender-based violence – First Nation, Inuit, and Métis women, girls, and LGBTQ and two-spirit people living in urban, rural, and remote locations. This investment will provide Indigenous women and children greater access to places of refuge when escaping violence, by supporting new shelters and transition housing for First Nations, Inuit and Métis peoples across the country, including on reserve, in the North, and in urban areas. This investment is also expected to benefit victims of crime and Indigenous individuals in contact with the criminal justice system, including accused persons and offenders, by supporting the implementation of Gladue Principles, and strengthening community-based justice systems and supporting self-determination.
While comprising roughly 5 per cent of the population of Canada, Indigenous people represent over 30 per cent of the incarcerated population. The overrepresentation of Indigenous women and youth is even more pronounced.
Measure GBA+
Timing
Target
Population
Expected Direct Benefits Included in or Announced:
Gender Income Distribution Inter- generational Additional
Characteristics
Early, Later
or Existing
Men – Women Strongly benefits
Low – High
Benefits
Youth –Senior
   
Chapter 4 - Prudent Fiscal Plan and Tax Fairness
Modernizing the Fiscal Stabilization Program Mid-point (when proposals are being finalized), and/or later stage (after proposals are finalized, prior to proposal submission). Provincial Governments Broadly gender-balanced No significant distributional impacts No significant intergenerational impacts or impacts generation between youth and seniors New in this Fall Economic Statement
  • The government is proposing legislative amendments to the Federal-Provincial Fiscal Arrangements Act to modernize the Fiscal Stabilization program on a prospective basis by indexing the $60 per capita cap set in 1987 to total Canadian economic growth per person since that time and by making technical changes for 2021-22 claims and onwards to modernize and simplify the program, enabling claims to be finalized roughly one year earlier.
All provincial governments are eligible for the Fiscal Stabilization payments if eligibility criteria are met. The federal government does not place restrictions on, or require reporting on, provincial use of Fiscal Stabilization payments. The provincial governments have the flexibility to direct Fiscal Stabilization payments according to their priorities and the needs of their residents.
Fair Taxation of Cross-Border Digital Products and Services Mid-point (when proposals are being finalized), and/or later stage (after proposals are finalized, prior to proposal submission). All Canadians Broadly gender-balanced No significant distributional impacts No significant intergenerational impacts or impacts generation between youth and seniors New in this Fall Economic Statement
  • Expected positive revenue impact of $1.2 billion over five years would result from measures enhancing collection of the federal GST on the purchases of cross-border digital supplies and services.
Digital products or services are consumed by both men and women. This measure is not expected to affect any particular group more than another. In this regard, the measure will help protect the tax base and GST/HST revenues for the federal and provincial governments. Tax revenues are used for government programs and services that broadly benefit all Canadians.
Fair Taxation of Goods Supplied through Fulfillment Warehouses Early in the idea development phase (when proposals are being developed) All Canadians Broadly gender-balanced No significant distributional impacts No significant intergenerational impacts or impacts generation between youth and seniors New in this Fall Economic Statement
  • Expected positive revenue impact of $1.6 billion over five years would result from measures enhancing the collection of the federal GST on sales of goods located in fulfillment warehouses in Canada.
Tax revenues are used for government programs and services that broadly benefit all Canadians. This measure is not expected to have negative differential impacts on different groups of people or to create, maintain or exacerbate existing gender or diversity inequalities. The results of Statistics Canada’s 2018 Canadian Internet Use Survey indicate that a similar proportion of men and women internet users buy new goods and services online (65.8 per cent and 64.1 per cent respectively). The results of this survey also indicate that Internet users aged 15 to 24 years and aged 65 years and over spent less on average ($678 and $656 respectively) on physical goods ordered over the Internet than all age groups ($1,165) surveyed. Households in the lowest income quartile shopped online at a lower rate (70.2 per cent), and households in the highest income quartile shopped at a higher rate (93.5 per cent), than all income quartiles (84.4 per cent) surveyed.
Fair Taxation of Short-term Accommodation through Digital Platforms Early in the idea development phase (when proposals are being developed) All Canadians Broadly gender-balanced No significant distributional impacts No significant intergenerational impacts or impacts generation between youth and seniors New in this Fall Economic Statement
  • Expected positive revenue impact of $360 million over five years would result from measures ensuring that the federal GST is collected on all short-term accommodations in Canada made through, or facilitated by, an accommodation platform.
According to one accommodation platform operator, 58 per cent of its hosts in Canada are women. There is no further breakdown or data as to the proportion of hosts that are single-income households versus households with a spouse or partner. Insofar as short-term rentals of private residences and other properties might affect the availability of longer-term rentals, approximately 30 per cent of Canadians rent their homes, and this form of housing tenure is especially important for low-to-moderate income families in large cities. This includes seniors, young professionals, one-parent households and immigrants.  According to a 2018 report prepared by Urbanation Inc. on the Ontario rental market, 46 per cent of Ontario renters spent 30 per cent or more of their household income on shelter in 2016.
Employee Stock Options Early in the idea development phase (when proposals are being developed) All Canadians Broadly gender-balanced Somewhat benefits low income individuals (Somewhat progressive) No significant intergenerational impacts or impacts generation between youth and seniors New in this Fall Economic Statement
  • Amend the Income Tax Act to limit the benefit of the employee stock option deduction for high-income individuals.
The tax benefits of the employee stock option deduction disproportionately accrue to a small number of high-income individuals. In 2018, 69 per cent of the aggregate value of the stock option deduction was claimed by about 2,400 individuals with total income of more than $1,000,000. Recipients are more likely to be men. In 2018, men represented about 72 per cent of tax filers and 86 per cent of the total amount of stock option benefits claimed. Osler, Hoskin & Harcourt LLP has reported that of those corporations listed on the TSX that have filed public diversity disclosure information for 2019, about 17 per cent of executive officers are women and about 19 per cent of board directors are women. As a result, it is anticipated that high-income men will be more negatively affected.
Combatting International Tax Evasion and Aggressive Tax Avoidance Later stage (after proposals are finalized, prior to submission of proposal) All Canadians Broadly gender-balanced No significant distributional impacts No significant intergenerational impacts or impacts generation between youth and seniors New in this Fall Economic Statement
  • $606.2 million over five years, starting in 2021-22, and $141.4 million ongoing for additional auditors and upgraded tools to combat international tax evasion and tax crimes such as money laundering and terrorist financing.
This proposal will increase tax fairness with targeted audits and updated tools to increase compliance. International tax evasion and aggressive tax planning can be found among all segments of the population, but mostly among the wealthiest groups, who have more opportunity and means to be engaged in such activities. CRA data suggest that high net worth groups normally associated with offshore audit results are skewed towards men who represent two-thirds of these completed audits. However, it should be noted that files are selected for audit solely based on financial information provided in tax returns and not the demographic characteristics of taxpayers.
Simplifying the Home Office Expense Deduction Mid-point (when proposals are being finalized), and/or later stage (after proposals are finalized, prior to proposal submission). Canadians Working from Home due to COVID-19 Broadly gender-balanced Somewhat benefits high income individuals (Somewhat regressive) No significant intergenerational impacts or impacts generation between youth and seniors Professionals, Office Workers New in this Fall Economic Statement
  • Allow employees who are working from home due to COVID-19 and eligible to claim home office expenses to deduct up to $400 in 2020 using a simplified flat rate, and generally do not request form T2200 from these employees.
The initiative will benefit Canadians working from home in 2020, and their employers. Beneficiaries of the initiative are likely to be gender-balanced, higher-income, and more highly educated than Canadians overall. Beneficiaries will be concentrated in industries and occupations where working from home is feasible which include professional, scientific and technical services, finance, insurance, real estate, rental and leasing, and educational services. Canadians whose jobs cannot be done from home, such as most workers in accommodation and food services, will not benefit from this imitative.

Definitions Used

Early in the idea development phase (when proposals are being developed)

Early in the idea development phase (when proposals are being developed).

Mid-point (when proposals are being finalized), and/or later stage (after proposals are finalized, prior to proposal submission).

Mid-point (when proposals are being finalized), and/or later stage (after proposals are finalized, prior to proposal submission).

Later stage (after proposals are finalized, prior to submission of proposal)

Later stage (after proposals are finalized, prior to submission of proposal).

Existing (modified or refreshed)

GBA+ was performed on the existing program (in cases where an existing program is seeking a renewal of funding). If the proposal is for an existing program, it was either modified to reflect the changes to the program or was refreshed to reflect that the program hasn’t changed since the GBA+ was last conducted.

Report a problem on this page
Please select all that apply:

Thank you for your help!

You will not receive a reply. For enquiries, please contact us.

Date modified: